HONR Courses

Below is a listing of the Spring 2020 HONR course offerings. Please note the HONR 19901/02 Evolutions of Ideas courses are for incoming first year students only; HONR 299, 399, and 499 courses are open to all undergraduate students with a 3.0 GPA or higher.

Click here to download a print-friendly PDF of our Spring 2020's HONR course offerings.

Click here to see all of the Study Away programs.


"INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO WRITING"

Instructor: Dr. Megha Anwer

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/anwer.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 10:30 - 11:45 am
Room: HCRS 1054
Course Description:
This course will initiate students into a culture of writing and critical thinking through a study of James Bond and his world of international espionage. The primary goals in the classroom will be twofold: first, to equip students with productive and empowering strategies that break down the writing process into a series of doable steps. The repeated practice of these strategies will facilitate students to employ words effectively, with confidence. By the end of the course students will have crafted and developed their own voice, their unique way of thinking and expressing ideas. It is impossible, however, to write effectively without reading and thinking critically. This is why our writing exercises will focus on “sexy spies.” Using James Bond as the central figure we will investigate the “007” franchise – Ian Fleming’s Bond novels and cinematic the renditions of Bond – from Sean Connery to Daniel Craig. In analyzing the rhetoric and thematic underpinnings of the Bond universe – its women, villains, bosses and secretaries, the sleuth’s prized gadgets and cars – we will explore the relationship between the words we produce and the worlds we inhabit. This course meets the university core requirement for written communication and *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108. Please consult your primary advisor.

"INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO WRITING"

Instructor: Dr. Jason Parry

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/parry.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 3:00-4:15 PM
Room: HCRS 1054
Course Description:
It is said that Aeneas carved the city of Segeste into being with his plow, drawing a line in the earth that separated the city from its surroundings. Humans have continued to partition the earth in this fashion, drawing loops around territories of different shapes and sizes. Despite these borders, however, the cycles of planetary metabolism have continued circulating globally, disrespecting the divisions humans have imposed upon its surface. Digital platforms, transnational infrastructure projects, and institutions of global governance have also disrupted these boundaries, raising the possibility of new forms of political organization and novel legal geographies. In this course we will explore the collision between inherited political structures and emerging planetary trends. Through readings and films, we will look at the viability of possible political futures adequate to the challenges we face in this century. Some of these potential modes of organization include autonomous polities populated by algorithms, breakaway microstates, virtual geographies and e-citizenship programs, and new communities brought into being by displacement and environmental change. This course meets the university core requirement for written communication and *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108. Please consult your primary advisor.

"RESEARCH NETWORKS"

Instructor: Dr. Natasha Duncan

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/duncan.php

Credit Hours: 1
Days/Times: M/W 11:30 AM - 12:20 PM
Room: HCRN 1143
This course meets January 14 - March 4, 2020
Course Description:
This course provides an introduction to interdisciplinary research so that Honors College students will be prepared to undertake the Scholarly Project. This course also provides hands-on opportunities to build your Honors cohort and to forge connections with other Honors College students and faculty, as well as with the students, faculty, and resources of Purdue as a whole. You will learn how to conduct interdisciplinary research by listening to guest faculty and student speakers; visiting labs, libraries, and workshops on campus; and attending departmental events. At the end of this course, you will have established your own research network at Purdue. Your final project will be to illustrate your individual research network, detailing the people and resources that will help you succeed in your undergraduate research endeavors. This course is only open to Honors College transfer students and continuing Honors College admitted students.

"VISITING SCHOLARS SEMINAR"

Instructor: Dr. Anna Ochs

Credit Hours: 1
Days/Times: TH 4:30 - 5:20 PM
Room: HCRN 1145
Course Description:
If you believe that variety is the spice of life, then this course is for you. Experience up-close and hands-on the phenomenal research and creative ventures that our Visiting Scholars program brings to the Honors College. Think about the world in new ways and explore the vast expanse of interdisciplinary discoveries at Purdue. Assignments will include presentations, reflections, and projects directly related to our visiting scholars’ expertise.

"VIDEO & THE GIG ECONOMY"

Instructor: Dr. Bobby Chastain

https://cla.purdue.edu/facultyStaff/profiles/new/newfaculty-18/Chastain_Bobby.html

Credit Hours: 1
Days/Times: M/W 2:30- 3:20 PM
Room: HCRN 1145
This course meets January 13 - March 4, 2020
Course Description:
This course will expose students to an array of topics pertaining to entrepreneurship in the arts. The lectures, readings, and activities will be mostly centered on the film and video industry. However, the skills and underlying curriculum will be relevant to any student that wants to participate in creative and artistic endeavors either as a career, side business, or semi-professional hobby. Likewise, the material will have transferable skills reaching a variety of career options in the “gig economy.”

"THE ANTHROPOCENE"

Instructor: Dr. Liz Brite

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/brite.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 12:00 - 1:15 PM
Room: HCRN 1143
Course Description:
At the turn of the new millennium, Nobel Prize Laureate Paul Crutzen and Eugene Stormer proposed that we had entered a new geologic epoch - the Anthropocene – a time when humans had become the dominant force on planet Earth. Anthropocene means “the human age,” and it is a concept that has become widely popular in scientific communities as a way to denote the extreme impacts humans are now having on the climate, the environment, and virtually all living things on Earth. Despite its popularity, however, the Anthropocene remains a hypothetical and hotly debated idea. The International Committee on Stratigraphy has yet to recognize it as a true geologic epoch (one that can be empirically observed in the layers of the Earth) and arguments persist over exactly when it may have begun, or the ways that the concept may mask the inequalities of environmental harm. At its heart, the Anthropocene asks us to reconsider the role of humanity on planet Earth and drives us towards agendas focused on planetary change. In this course, we will explore the philosophical and scientific discourses of the Anthropocene and the concept’s implications for our present and future. Students will engage in developing their own positionality in relation to emerging knowledge on planetary change through a group project to bring prominent scholars of the Anthropocene to campus.

"ANIMALS, SOCIETY & EDUCATION"

Instructor: Dr. Nadine Dolby

Credit Hours:3
Days/Times: T/TH 10:30 - 11:45 AM
Room: HCRN 1143
Course Description:
This is an exciting time to learn about the changing role of animals in society. Everyday, there are fresh insights into our understanding of animals: we are learning that they more like humans than we knew before. This class will look how humans are socialized to relate to animals; the different roles of animals in human society and education (for example, as companions, food, and entertainment); animal welfare and animal rights; and the current science of animal sentience, cognition and emotion.

"HISTORY OF AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY"

Instructor: Dr. Richard French

https://polytechnic.purdue.edu/profile/rmfrench

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 1:30 - 2:45 PM
Room: HCRS 1054
Course Description:
Aerospace technologies are an important part of modern societies, and it can be difficult to understand their implications or make correct policy decisions without some historical context. This class will explore important historical developments and how the new technologies they created have affected societies. It will start with the early 1800s and progress to the present, touching continuously on how our understanding of science and engineering of flight has changed our world. During the semester, we will move through to the present, focusing on the developments that had the most technical and social effect rather than the ones that are the most well‐known. It is important that the subject matter not be an abstraction, so we will duplicate some of the early experiments by making small airplanes and rockets of our own. For example, we will make small free flight gliders akin to those made by George Cayley around 1804. We will use them to explore early discoveries in aerodynamics and vehicle stability. We will then make slightly larger gliders with simple radio control systems so that we can understand the historical challenges of controlling airplanes and the effects of simple design changes.

"FUGIVITY"

Instructor: Dr. Peter Moore

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/moore.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 12:00 - 1:15 PM
Room: HCRN 1145
Course Description:
Some people want to run things, and some things just want to run. This is a class about the latter, or better yet, it is a class about the way in which these two imperatives—to exact control and to imagine flight—are inextricably bound up with one another. In pursuing this topic, we will attend to a specific historical circumstance and its many afterlives. In the thirty or more years preceding the American Civil War, enslaved men and women of African descent made use of an elaborate network of transit and shelter to escape from the slave economy of the southern states. Referred to as the Underground Railroad, the passage has remained a persistent concern of black cultural expression. We will study its movement across time and media, from the slave narrative to the serial poem, from the folk ballad to the chopped sample, and from scissored silhouette to spliced footage. We will consider the invisible road to freedom in its historical context and as a conceit for liberatory theories of social life. All aspects of the course are designed to feed into a final assignment. Students will have an opportunity to make a significant contribution to the study of fugitivity through working collaboratively on a plan for a digital humanities project.

"IM/MORTALITY"

Instructor: Dr. Zahra Tehrani

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 10:30 - 11:45 AM
Room: HCRS 1066
Course Description:
This interdisciplinary course introduces you biological, psychological and social theories of aging to provide foundational knowledge regarding how and why we age. Given new medical technologies, is it possible that humans will stop aging together? Would that be desirable? What would it mean to be “immortal,” and why do are we drawn to the idea? The biological question of lifespan opens up to (and is informed by) issues of population, resources, policy, family dynamics, and personal well-being. Do you want to live forever? What would the world be like if we did?

"JAZZ"

Instructor: Dr. Jason Ware

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/ware.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 9:00 - 10:15 AM
Room: HCRS 1066
Course Description:
Jazz artists “speak to each other in the language of music.” This course will explore the nature of this artistic conversation with many of its cultural influences, geographical variations, and temporal iterations. Throughout our time together we will interrogate varying facets of the social impact such a conversation facilitates. Furthermore, we will explore the musical language of jazz with its power to make collective performance stronger both within and beyond music. And we will investigate the ways in which this artists' talk became the "talk of the town" and country as a medium through which people could break from dominant cultures. We will make sense of and process our journey by creating our own metaphorical jazz ensemble, featuring the complex and layered textures of our lives as inspiration for the note and lyric. **You do not need to be a musician to take this course**

"JUDGMENT & DECISION MAKING"

Instructor: Dr. Torsten Reimer

https://www.cla.purdue.edu/directory/profiles/torsten-reimer.html

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 12:00 - 1:15 PM
Room: HCRS 1054
Course Description:
How do people make decisions? Some argue this is one of the most intriguing questions social scientists have ever asked. When you pick a meal in a restaurant, how do you choose among the dishes on the menu? When you plan for your future financial security, how do you decide where to invest your money? When you find yourself wondering whether to play soccer on Sunday or prepare for your classes, how do you make up your mind? This class is designed for undergraduate students who are interested in exploring the fascinating landscape of decisionmaking. Decision-making research is an interdisciplinary endeavor that draws from several disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences, including psychology, organizational behavior, and political science. We will review and discuss normative as well as descriptive models for making decisions with incomplete information and uncertain consequences (e.g., lens-model framework, heuristics and biases approach, models of intuitive decision making, bounded rationality). Participants will experience a number of “cognitive illusions” and learn how to avoid some of the most prevalent decision traps. As part of the course requirements, students are expected to work on two group projects and to apply a decision theory to a domain of their interest (e.g., managerial decision-making, groups and teams, health and risk, political voting, or marketing and social influence).

"AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER"

Instructor: Dr. Brandon Keehn

https://www.purdue.edu/hhs/slhs/directory/faculty/keehn_brandon.html

Instructor: Dr. Carolyn McCormick

https://www.purdue.edu/hhs/hdfs/directory/faculty/mccormick_carolyn.html

Instructor: Dr. Mandy Rispoli

https://www.education.purdue.edu/faculty-profiles/name/mandy-rispoli/

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 9:00 - 10:15 AM
Room: HCRN 1143
Course Description:
This interdisciplinary course will address multiple areas of autism-related knowledge including human genetics, cognitive and neurological models, clinical diagnosis, treatment options, and media portrayals. Each week students will watch videos of seminal research in the field of autism (or media portrayals of autism) and will read autism-related research findings. In-class discussions will build on this multimedia base and students will leave with a foundational understanding of autism-related research in neuroscience, social sciences, education, and clinical practice.

"MEDICAL BREAKTHROUGHS"

Instructor: Dr. William Clark

https://engineering.purdue.edu/ChE/people/ptProfile?resource_id=163998

Credit Hours: 2
Days/Times: M/W 10:30 - 11:20 AM
Room: HCRN 1143
This course meets March 9 - April 29, 2020
Course Description:
Technology plays a critical role in the delivery of healthcare. Innovation over the past century has led to medical breakthroughs that have reduced mortality and morbidity while also improving the quality of life of millions of people. Examples of such breakthroughs include products developed by both the pharmaceutical (e.g., antibiotics, anti-cancer drugs, and antihypertensives) and medical device (e.g., technology for heart surgery, dialysis, and joint replacement) industries. Moreover, the medical technology sector is a major economic driver of the overall US healthcare industry, which accounts for approximately 17% of the US GDP. The purpose of this course is to assess various aspects of the central role that medical technology plays in healthcare delivery in the US. The course is divided into five modules. The first module provides a review of major technology developments in the past century and the manner in which they have impacted daily life. Module II details the “patientcentric” approach used for new medical technology development and the interplay between patients, healthcare technology companies, and the other important components of the “ecosystem”. Module III focuses on the manner in which the clinical need for a new technology is identified and the pathway that is followed from the original product concept to market release. Module IV involves a discussion of evolving fields within the medical technology realm, including precision medicine and artificial intelligence. Finally, a number of controversies relevant to medical technology are highlighted in Module V.
This course meets twice weekly and also online.

"THE NUCLEAR AGE"

Instructor: Dr. Jonathan Reinstra-Kiracofe

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: MWF 2:30 - 3:20 PM
Room: HCRS 1054
Course Description:
The nuclear age is nearly 75 years old. However, many college students have little to no understanding of nuclear weapons or nuclear power. This course will introduce students to the science, history, and geopolitics of the Nuclear Age and enable them to think critically of the ethics surrounding nuclear weapons and nuclear power. Students will study the science of nuclear physics to understand how an atomic bomb works and to understand the science behind different types of nuclear weapons. Students will likewise learn the science of nuclear power generation. Students will study the history of the development of nuclear weapons and nuclear power, including the politics that influenced their use and proliferation. Finally, students will learn basic philosophy of ethics and apply their own sense of ethics to present arguments for or against the particular use or role that nuclear weapons or power plays in modern society.

"REPLICANTS"

Instructor: Dr. Katie Jarriel

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/jarriel.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 1:30 - 2:45 PM
Room: HCRS 1066
Course Description:
From ancient mythology to Blade Runner 2020, the creation of artificial humans has captured the human imagination. This course asks: how do the materials we use to re-create the human body affect the way that we construct our humanity? We will examine the different materials people have used to replicate the body throughout history. The course is organized thematically by materials such as wood, wax, silicone, and digital media. This course emphasizes hands-on learning; we will cast wax masks, attend a pottery studio, and work at the Bechtel Center, among other experiential activities. The types of replicants we will study in this course range from voodoo dolls to Real Dolls, death masks to Deep Fakes, and statues to cyborgs. For the final project, you will choose a material and bring to life a replicant of your own.

"SPACETIME!"

Instructor: Dr. Adam Watkins

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/watkins.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 3:00-4:15 PM
Room: HCRN 1143
Course Description:
This course will boldly go where no course has gone before, providing students the chance to explore strange new ideas about space and time. Want to write a sequel to Interstellar or your own episode of Star Trek? Want to see how our idea of spacetime has evolved in response to religion, philosophy, and physics? Want to hear Purdue scientists talk about science fiction that matters to them? To study spacetime requires that we engage a variety of perspectives from the past and present. In that sense, HONR 399: Spacetime! is deeply historical and philosophical in its approach. The course also takes an active interest in creative processes behind scientific thought. To that end, students will explore how arts and symbolic thought have played significant roles in scientific discoveries, including Einstein’s. Students will also practice creative modes of inquiry firsthand, as course projects will be based in creative writing practices. [Note: projects will be assessed on critical and creative thinking, not artistic quality.]

"SECURITY: TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY"

Instructor: Dr. Dwaine Jengelley

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/jengelley.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 9:00 - 10:15 AM
Room: HCRS 1054
Course Description:
From Hiroshima to Chernobyl to Fukushima, technology created to protect the homeland or as alternative energy sources have had destructive consequences for societies. “Deadly” technology is at the forefront of national security imperatives pursued by sub-national actors for strengthening their bargaining positions. They have also been adopted by societies to power economic development. While these technologies hold promises of securing society, they may pose deadly challenges for the local, national, or international community. In this course, we examine the technology behind chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear weapons and energy as well as the political, economic, environmental, and psychological impacts of these technologies.

"TECHNOLOGY, WAR & STRATEGY"

Instructor: Dr. Robert Kirchubel

https://cla.purdue.edu/research/forces-initiative/team.html

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 1:30 - 2:45 PM
Room: HCRN 1143
Course Description:
This course introduces students to strategy on a global scale. The course is rooted in political, military, economic and cultural strategy, and it engages core ideas that cut across disparate schools of thought and historical contexts. Course materials expose students to a set of historical and contemporary strategic dilemmas that involve difficult trade-offs, costly investments, wild risks, incredible victories, and crushing defeats. Learning outcomes of this multidisciplinary course will focus on the core strategic principles of: 1. Developing and analyzing system-level trade-offs 2. Long-term planning on a national scale 3. Devolving authority and allowing for chance contingency while staying on mission 4. Maintaining individual morals and national values in strategic thinking 5. Balancing the possibilities and limits of soft power (money, prestige, culture) as strategic tools of influence 6. Examining the learning competition aspects of strategy and security Technology, War, and Strategy prepares students to appreciate and understand the foundational principles involved in designing and executing broad strategic initiatives with world-changing consequences. It invites students to put themselves in the roles of past, present, and future leaders to understand the risks assumed and the responsibilities faced. Students will encounter principles and that will enable them to design, bring to life, manage, and assess options that impact (1) large groups of people, (2) large spaces, and (3) national initiatives that unfold over long time frames. Students will learn to balance complex trade-offs and to leverage systems thinking and interdisciplinary knowledge sets.

"RESEARCH IN EARLY MODERN PRINT"

Instructor: Dr. Liz Mercier

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 1:30 - 2:45 PM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
Course Description:
In this hands-on research seminar, students will work with original, rare materials in a way that will inform their understanding of the value of these texts, the value of the history of print in a world that is becoming increasingly more digitized, the value of studying the languages in which these texts were written, and the value of fields tangential to our investigations: Art History, Classical Languages, Medieval and Early Modern History, Library Science, and Archival Studies. Students will have the opportunity to explore digital repositories of rare book collections from all over the world in addition to utilizing online databases for identifying certain features of the books (printers’ devices and watermarks, for example). Students will also be invited to contribute ideas toward the development of the online Rare Book Registry once the initial cataloging is under way.

"BORDERLANDS"

Instructor: Dr. Natasha Duncan

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/duncan.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: M/W 3:30 - 4:20 PM
Room: HCRN 1143
This course meets January 14 - March 4, 2020 and spring break March 14-21, 2020
Course Description:
The Borderlands is an experiential program that examines the complexities of the US immigration system and immigration policy by immersing students in a seven-day experience in Tucson, AZ, and Nogales, Mexico, during spring break. The course will be conducted in two parts: (1) weekly classes over the first eight weeks of the spring 2020 semester; and (2) participation in the study away to the US-Mexico border over spring break. During the immersive experience, you will interact with immigrants and various actors involved in immigration advocacy as well as observe policy implementation and contemplate some important questions such as: Who are immigrants? Why and how do they move? What are the challenges faced or opportunities gained having migrated? What influences the United States policy towards immigration and what is its impact? What are our obligations toward the human rights of migrants? Cost: $1000 inclusive of roundtrip airfare, lodging, all meals, activities, and ground transportation.

"JAZZ IN NOLA"

Instructor: Dr. Jason Ware

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/ware.php

Credit Hours: 2
Spring Break
March 14-21, 2020
Course Description:
To study jazz is to study away, to take one’s place in a boogaloo procession breaking out of the classroom and into the streets, the kitchens, the club, the porch, the hall. To study jazz is to trace a tradition that has itself traveled from Africa to the American South, from the South to the industrial North, and from there to corners of the world. More than just a musical genre, jazz names a way of life, a means of recording history, a stump from which to express one’s personal needs and desires, a lab for the social production of culture. Along these lines, we will use the city of New Orleans and the style of New Orleans Jazz as a case point for understanding the music and culture of improvisation. We will explore the emergence of jazz music against the historical backdrop of the transatlantic slave trade and research the process by which a certain style of American music was solidified into a specific genre, known as jazz. This is a study away course during spring break to New Orleans, Louisiana. Cost: $1600 plus airfare

"LEONARDO DA VINCI"

Instructor: Dr. Dino Felluga

Credit Hours: 1
Days/Times: T/TH 2:30 - 3:20 pm
Room: HCRN 1145
This course meets January 13 - March 5, 2020 and has a Study Abroad component during Spring Break, March 14-21, 2020
Course Description:
This course explores the transition from the medieval period to the Renaissance across multiple disciplines, thus laying out how much of what we take for granted today about technology or about the human subject were implemented in this rich period, especially in Italy. The focus for the course will be that most famous Renaissance man, Leonardo da Vinci. We will also address advancements of the period in engineering, architecture, biology, astronomy and governance. We will clarify how new forms of scientific investigation were made possible because of changes in thinking about time, space, law, governance, and the human subject during this time period, all supported by the fact that Italy was the most important center for printing before the Roman Catholic Inquisition began heavily censuring such publications. This exploration will help students also to think about the analogous changes being effected by technology in our current postmodern period, as well as the advantages of cross-disciplinary thinking. This course is only open to students who are taking Dr. Felluga’s spring break study abroad program, "daVinci in Italy” Cost: $2575 inclusive of airfare, lodging, and ground/water transportation.