HONR Courses

Below is a listing of the Fall 2020 HONR course offerings. Please note the HONR 19901/02 Evolutions of Ideas courses are for incoming first year students only; HONR 299, 399, and 499 courses are open to all undergraduate students with a 3.0 GPA or higher.

Click here to download a print-friendly PDF of our Fall 2020's HONR course offerings.

Click here to see all of the Study Away programs.


CRN 68555

Instructor: Dr. Peter Moore

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/moore.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 1:30 PM - 2:45 PM
Room: HCRS 1054
Course Description:
In every field of expertise, there are ways of doing things that make the experts anxious. From literary studies and musicology to the history of architecture and linguistics, the term vernacular has been applied to those forms of expression that circumvent disciplinary standards. Since vernacular is the site of profound interdisciplinary intervention, it belongs to no single branch of knowledge and has no consistent definition. But it is exactly this complexity, this messiness, that makes it so attractive to writers, artists and intellectuals interested in thinking beyond the boundaries of their vocation. In this course we will examine closely the creative life of the outsider, in the various forms it takes, from graffiti and indigenous building practices to slang and folk medicine. We will track the term across time, beginning with Varo’s De Lingua Latina (47-45 B.C.), moving to the medieval era with Dante’s De Vulgari Eloquentia (1302), before considering its emergence in modern times. We will ask the following questions: Does resistance precede standardization or vice versa? Is there a link between the various definitions of the vernacular? How has the vernacular been used to fashion myths of exclusionary nationalism? What is the nature of broken beauty? As a writing course, we will use the example of vernacular speech to think critically about the standards of essay writing, in hopes that we might challenge those standards by harnessing the power of the voice. This course meets the core requirement for written communication and *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108. Please consult your primary advisor.

CRN 22319

Instructor: Dr. Kristina Bross

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/bross.php

Credit Hours: 1
Days/Times: M 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
This hybrid format course will also meet online once/week.
This course meets August 24 – October 15, 2020.
Course Description:
This course provides an introduction to interdisciplinary research so that Honors College students will be prepared to undertake the Scholarly Project. This course also provides hands-on opportunities to build your Honors cohort and to forge connections with other Honors College students and faculty, as well as with the students, faculty, and resources of Purdue as a whole. You will learn how to conduct interdisciplinary research by listening to guest faculty and student speakers; visiting labs, libraries, and workshops on campus; and attending departmental events. At the end of this course, you will have established your own research network at Purdue. Your final project will be to illustrate your individual research network, detailing the people and resources that will help you succeed in your undergraduate research endeavors. This course is only open to Honors College transfer students and continuing Honors College admitted students.

CRN 21951

Instructor: Cara Putman

https://krannert.purdue.edu/directory/bio.php?username=cputman

Credit Hours: 1
Days/Times: T 4:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
Course Description:
Every semester, our campus hosts a changing line-up of distinguished leaders from various realms, from CEOs and politicians to university presidents. This 1-credit HONR seminar offers students the opportunity to hone their ideas about leadership and to reflect on their own leadership goals by engaging the ideas of these campus guests. Students in the seminar will attend talks and events with these visitors, whose work they will engage on numerous levels, from preparatory research to final reflection. The goal of this seminar is to launch students on their own leadership paths by allowing them to analyze and reflect upon the pathways that visiting leaders have taken on their road to Purdue. Students should plan on attending some events outside of class time as part of their effort for the course.

CRN 18525

Instructor: Dr. James Tanoos

https://polytechnic.purdue.edu/profile/jtanoos

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: F 8:30 AM - 11:20 AM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
Course Description:
This course will present case-based dilemmas and convene in-class teams to analyze an array of these organizational quandaries. Team projects will require time-sensitive, collaborative efforts to create and deliver presentations that address the predicaments. This project integrates several concepts, including leadership, humanities, technical content, design thinking, and current events, and it operates via a transformative approach to instruction that allows for an applied approach in classroom pedagogy.

CRN 18556

Instructors: Dr. Martin Jun

https://engineering.purdue.edu/ME/People/ptProfile?resource_id=156378

Dr. TJ Kim

https://www.cla.purdue.edu/facultystaff/profiles/new/newfaculty-14/Kim._TongJin.html

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: W 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
Course Description:
Maker education is an approach to problem-based and project-based learning that relies upon hands-on activity and transformation of ideas into prototypes. In this course, students will be focusing on design for manufacturing and commercialization, understanding how their ideas can come to life by making. We will consider markets of many kinds: we will visit local stores or manufacturers to understand different product categories, how things are made and how things are sold in the market, and we will consider the commercial “value” of students’ education at Purdue. Our goal is to design and develop product solutions that can be made using the many digital and analog fabrication tools that are available in our University. Students in this course will take a product of their own design from idea to fabrication to market.

CRN 18558

Instructor: Dr. Richard Rand

Credit Hours: 2
Days/Times: M/W 4:30 PM - 5:20 PM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
Course Description:
Education is more than receiving knowledge and studying facts. It involves heightened self-awareness, indepth investigation, active self-reflection, and the discovery of one’s larger purpose. The process of understanding one’s self is a dynamic act. Lessons from your past shape the way you live in the present and define how you will evolve in the future. Understanding these lessons can only take place when you understand the story of your life. Understanding your life story begins with the daily journal, crystallizes in the personal anthropology, and culminates in the public presentation of your life story. Alongside classroom readings and discussion, the assignments help distill lessons from the past, clarify intentions in the present, provide insight into your larger purpose, and enable you to envision and create your future.

This class will include philosophical, psychological, and anthropological approaches to understanding the self, and the self in relationship to culture. Historical and genealogical research, journaling, creative writing, and storytelling activities will enable you to choose an expressive medium for your life story.

CRN 16377

Instructors: Dr. Nadine Dolby

https://www.education.purdue.edu/faculty-profiles/name/nadine-dolby/

Dr. Jennifer Dehn

https://www.purdue.edu/vet/directory/person.php?id=1306

Credit Hours: 1
Days/Times: W 9:30 AM - 10:20 AM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
This hybrid course will also meet online once/week.
This course meets October 16 – December 5, 2020.
Course Description:
This course will examine multiple facets of the human-animal bond, which is the mutually beneficial relationship between humans and animals. The course draws on research from multiple fields, including psychology, sociology, social work, anthropology, veterinary medicine, nursing, education, and anthrozoology. Focusing on companion animals and the human-animal bond, topics include:

  • Medical and psychological/social benefits of the human-animal bond, and connections (e.g., domestic violence)
  • Historical/contemporary/cultural context of the changing human-animal bond
  • Examples of human-animal bond therapies and practices, including animal-assisted therapies (service and therapy dogs, PTSD, autism) and associated practices (e.g., cat lounges, therapy animals in nursing homes)
  • The evolving nature of companion animals (pets), including the growth of the pet industry, end-of-life care for pe the veterinary social work profession, and the expanding definition of companion animals

CRN 16394/16403

Instructor: Dr. Megha Anwer

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/anwer.php

Credit Hours: 2
Days/Times: T 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
This hybrid course will also meet online once/week.
This course meets August 24 – October 15, 2020.
Course Description:
This course explores the films of Alfred Hitchcock – the “Master of Suspense.” Hitchcock, who directed films for over five decades, has been touted as the last Victorian and the first Modernist auteur (cinematic author). In a sense, then, his films chart the making and unmaking of the 20th century in the West. Through a close analysis of films such as The Lodger, Psycho, Birds, Rope, Rear Window, Rebecca, Dial M for Murder, Shadow of Doubt, Notorious, North By North West, Strangers on a Train and Vertigo we will ask: how do these filmtexts reconceive the very meaning and nature of modern crime, murder and mystery? We will also explore how the aesthetic developments in his films between the 1920s to the 1970s point not only to improvements in cinematic technology but also to shifts in his political-cinematic preoccupations. While much has been written and discussed about the far reaching influence that his style had on Hollywood (popularly called the “Hitchcock-Effect”) and the problematic depiction of gender, sexuality, criminality and deviancy in his films – all of which we too will study – what receives less attention is the way in which Hitchcock manufactured a whole new way of depicting urban spaces.

One of our primary concerns, then, will be to study Alfred Hitchcock’s filmography for its remarkable achievement in mapping the city as the spatial context and condition of urban crime. The city is not just a passive ‘backdrop’ to crime in Hitchcock’s films – the city in fact becomes a key agent and provocateur, a major dramatis persona in the occurrence of crime. We will, thus, explore the status of the Hitchcockian image by arguing that in Hitchcock the visual is the urban. Be it the opening sequence of Frenzy where the strangled naked body of a woman floats up the Thames in London, be it the glorious yet somehow strange and sinister Manhattan skyline ominously visible from inside the apartment in Rope, or be it the surreal undulations of a foggy San Francisco landscape in Vertigo – the visible geography of the city in each case is what draws us into a potentially violent modernity. Narrativizing the city, then, is to narrativize our cultural psyche, where our identities correspond to the material urban surfaces we traverse, brush against, and are remodeled by. The cinematic city is as fundamental to Hitchcock’s work as the genre of violent crime is: the irreducible codependency of the two is what really makes Hitchcock tick. Without the city, there would be no Hitchcock crime thriller as we know it. Without Hitchcock’s crime-thrillers, we wouldn’t have as rich an understanding of urban spaces as we do!

The 2-credit course will have an online-component which will entail film viewing for class; access to films will be given on D2L Bright Space.

CRN 16359

Instructor: Dr. Adam Watkins

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/watkins.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: TH 3:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
This hybrid course will also meet online once/week.
Course Description:
What does it mean to be human? What place do humans occupy in the grand scheme of things? Are all humans equal? Consider for a moment that in 1800 the answers to these questions differed greatly from what people generally believe today. This was a time before psychology, neurology, and sociology were established disciplines; it was a time of quack theories, mad science, and the birth of science fiction.

By exploring key discoveries and great literary works, students will discover how science and the arts collaborated in a radical redesign of the human subject across the nineteenth century. For instance, students will explore how R.L Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde drew from cutting-edge psychological research, and how Charles Darwin incorporated nineteenth-century narrative tricks into On the Origin of Species to make his theory more palatable. The class is strongly discussion based, and students will participate in exciting projects geared around their individual interests, including the invention of their own quack theory and the creation of a short horror story based on cutting-edge scientific research, after the model of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

CRN 18564

Instructor: Dr. Stacey Connaughton

https://cla.purdue.edu/directory/profiles/stacey-connaughton.html

Instructor: Dr. Allison Roberts

https://www.purdue.edu/discoverypark/ppri/about/index.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 1:30 PM - 2:45 PM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
Course Description:
This course will encourage participants to speak freely, enquire, and delve deeply into personal stories about the experience of war. Our diverse team of student military veterans and military-related students, traditional students, and faculty will lead an engaged classroom experience and community meetings that utilize humanities texts to prompt engaged dialogue among veterans and members of the US Armed Forces (active duty, Reserves, National Guard, and ROTC students), their family members, and the civilian community. The course readings will include sources—specifically memoirs, poems, letters, and (auto)biographies—from the American Revolutionary War, the Civil War, World War I, and recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Students in the class will learn about and discuss the effects of war for both civilians and military service members. Experiences of war, within the military as well as reintegration into civilian society, will be examined.

CRN 16371

Instructors: Dr. Dwaine Jengelley

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/jengelley.php

Pallavi Gupta

https://engineering.purdue.edu/GEP/People

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T 3:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
This hybrid course will also meet online once/week.
Course Description:
This course focuses on the complexities of creating and implementing development plans in countries all over the world. Many development strategies are presented as “one size fits all" solutions. However, the idiosyncrasies of individual societies or regions challenge this perspective. Neither is development simply a national issue. If you have an interest in tackling complex global problems, then Global Development Challenges is the course for you. We live in an era defined by some as hyper-globalization, where problems transcend national borders and solutions require global responses. In this course, you will understand the fundamental theories and international institutional structures of international development. For an applied approach, you will also learn from the firsthand experiences of development professionals, who will visit class. Finally, for a better understanding of the multifaceted dimensions of development issues, we take an interdisciplinary approach to studying some of the most challenging development problems (e.g., persistent poverty, health security). Upon completion of this course, students will gain experience in project planning, management and execution principles in designing and executing development projects; consult with subject matter specialists; communicate research to an interdisciplinary audience including journalists; have a greater appreciation of the benefits of working with a diverse group of scholars on complex problems. Improved team building, writing and presentation skills are also foundational to the course.

CRN 16436

Instructor: Dr. Liz Brite

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/brite.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
This hybrid course will also meet online once/week.
Course Description:
The Holocene is the geologic epoch of the last 11,700 years. It is a period of stable and warm climate that has witnessed the growth of human civilizations worldwide – all written history, cities and urban life, complex technologies, and states and empires have arisen exclusively during this period. Why? The favorable environmental conditions of the Holocene have allowed us to transform the environment and exploit its resources to an extreme degree, principally through production practices based in agriculture. In this course, we will explore this relationship between climate, environment, and the development of human societies throughout the geologic epoch of the Holocene. A principle focus will be the critical role that agriculture has played in the development of our species and in accelerating our impacts on Earth’s ecosystems. In addition to surveying this deep history, students will engage in new knowledge creation about the Holocene through ethnographic research and writing. Together as a class, we will address the current debate about the Holocene’s end – the idea that humanity’s abilities to transform the environment have become so significant and so extreme that they are driving the Earth system into a new epoch. In particular, students will observe and consider agriculture’s ongoing evolution and impacts on the environment and its role in broader systems of anthropogenic change.

CRN 16500

Instructor: Dr. Jason Ware

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/ware.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM LAB)
Course Description:
Tokyo, Berlin, Vienna, Copenhagen, and Munich are the five most livable cities in the world according to Monocle’s 2016 Quality of Life index. They are the highest ranking cities when using metrics to measure crime, emergency services’ response time, transportation networks, cycling culture, food, drink, retail, and the number of independent bookshops. Monocle’s Quality of Life survey is merely one among the many that exist to rank the world’s best cities, but wealth is one theme that emerges from among the varying indecies and their respective results. The metrics, indeed the participants responding to the metrics, represent populations of people with high levels of discretionary income. How might the metrics reflect different values if these indices include a different kind of participant, such as the urban poor? Our goal in this course is to investigate indicators of community well-being related to quality of life with urban poor communities. The underlying premise is that urban poor communities across the globe – living even in Tokyo, Berlin, Vienna, Copenhagen, and Munich – have negligible influence in determining the criteria for measuring a city’s livability. We’ll imagine that material realities of poverty manifest in issues of failing infrastructure and poor living conditions that compromise healthy living, and that social realities manifest in decreased educational attainment and outcomes. All of which suggests that urban poor communities may produce collectively a set of metrics, of indicators, that create a different picture of what it looks like to live within urban environments. We’ll plan to work with urban poor communities within the Greater Lafayette area to create and capture these indicators, the result of which will be a set of inclusive indicators for influencing policy and producing enhanced local future outcomes and community wellbeing.

CRN 21950

Instructor: Dr. Katie Jarriel

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/jarriel.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 1:30 PM - 2:45 PM
Room: HCRS 1066
Course Description:
What is our place in the world? We often mean this question metaphorically, but our literal place in the world – the spaces we inhabit, the built environment around us, and even the ways we think about space – influences us in profound ways. Insights from geospatial analysis are sometimes amazing: for example, the 1854 map of cholera outbreak made by Dr. John Snow in London led him to hypothesize that the disease spread through contaminated public water sources. However, spatial data can also be used to create inequalities within society, such as gerrymandering, redlining, and the colonial practice of partitioning cultural groups. This course explores critical topics in geospatial analysis and the spatial turn, an intellectual movement that emphasizes space, place, and landscape as ways of understanding questions about our place in the world. We will learn how maps make arguments and how, sometimes, maps lie. We will discuss examples of different approaches to space, such as Foucault’s panopticon, Disney’s Magic Kingdom, Bourdieu’s Berber House, and Green’s Paper Towns. Students will try methods of geospatial analysis, from old-fashioned paper mapping to QGIS. For their final project, students will create and analyze a spatial dataset of their choosing.

Distance Learning Courses for Residential Learners

CRN 20110

Instructor: Dr. Kristina Bross

https://cla.purdue.edu/directory/profiles/kristina-bross.html

Credit Hours: 1
Course Description:
This 1-credit HONR seminar offers students an opportunity to explore the intellectual wealth of the Honors College Visiting Scholars Program, which is designed to bring esteemed guests from a wide array of fields to Purdue. Every semester, the college hosts a range of visitors from across the disciplines, from scientists, scholars, and artists, to activists, economists, and engineers. Students in the seminar will attend virtual events with these scholars, engage their work and engage with their work. Assignments for the course will include preparing for scholarly visits by researching the background and published work of our guests, attending events in the VSP series, and interacting with the ideas of our visitors through various forms of media output. Students should plan on attending some events outside of class time as part of their effort for the course.

CRN 28428

Instructor: Dr. Kristina Bross

https://cla.purdue.edu/directory/profiles/kristina-bross.html

Credit Hours: 1
This course meets August 24 - October 15, 2020
Course Description:
This course provides an introduction to interdisciplinary research so that Honors College students will be prepared to undertake the Scholarly Project. This course also provides hands-on opportunities to build your Honors cohort and to forge connections with other Honors College students and faculty, as well as with the students, faculty, and resources of Purdue as a whole. You will learn how to conduct interdisciplinary research by listening to guest faculty and student speakers; visiting labs, libraries, and workshops on campus; and attending departmental events. At the end of this course, you will have established your own research network at Purdue. Your final project will be to illustrate your individual research network, detailing the people and resources that will help you succeed in your undergraduate research endeavors.

This course is only open to Honors College transfer students and continuing Honors College admitted students.

CRNs 18571 & 18580

Instructor: Dr. Richard Thomas

https://cla.purdue.edu/directory/profiles/richard-k.-thomas.html

Credit Hours: 3
Course Description:
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to an aesthetic vocabulary of design elements that is useful in both visual and auditory design and music composition. By the end of this semester, students should be able to articulate an individual aesthetic regarding the art of music, identify elements of color, mass, time, space, and line in sound scores, and demonstrate a keen ability to recognize and identify how music is being used to mediate messages in an increasingly complex society.

This project-based course includes weekly introductory lecture/discussions using take-home quizzes that trace the evolution of music and theatre, and how core elements of design and composition evolved to become artistic tools. Students then explore these elements first by identifying, sharing and discussing outstanding examples of the Academy Award winning work of composers, sound editors and sound mixers in context of the films themselves. Students next develop simple recording projects in which they attempt to incite specific emotions of love, fear, anger, joy and sadness in their peers by isolating the design element under consideration. Students then work in groups to develop more complex sonic immersions to which they eventually attach messages. In the final project, students choose between a research project/presentation in which they update current research on a course topic that is particularly relevant to them, or create a composition in which they attempt to immerse their audience (i.e. students in the class) in the deeper experience of a Shakespeare Sonnet through creation of their own sound score.

HONR 39900 Music as a Chariot is intended for students who are keenly interested in exploring the relationship between the experience of music in life and the ideas attached to it. The course is structured to not require compositional ability or experience, but also embraces those who do.

CRN 25354

Instructor: Dr. Megha Anwer

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/anwer.php

Credit Hours: 1
This course meets August 24 – October 15, 2020.
Course Description:
In this online course, we will work with racial and colonial images of violence in the U.S and in India, straddling multiple historical contexts from the 19th to the 21st century. Our attention will turn to photographs, graphic novels, videos, music (Billy Holiday’s “Strange Fruit”), virtual tours of anti-racist museums and monuments in the US, and of visual archives in India. Our conversations will engage important questions: what do these images of racial violence tell us about the age that produced them? What are the aesthetic formulae of representing racial violence, and how do these vary across different media formats? How have artists, musicians, photographers, critical race theorists interrupted and challenged the circulation of a racist visual vocabulary? How do we ‘consume’ such images, despite the horrors they represent, and without participating in a culture that feeds on images of violence against racial minorities? And finally, what lessons can we learn from the global and temporal continuities of such images?

CRN 25331

Instructor: Dr. Pete Moore

HTTPS://HONORS.PURDUE.EDU/ABOUT-US/FACULTY/MOORE.PHP

Credit Hours: 1
This course meets October 16 – December 5, 2020.
Course Description:
This online course visits the site of absence, studying iconic structures that no longer exist. We will think about reasons for demolition and the effects of progress, while also attending to the ways in which these bygone structures persist in contemporary filmic and literary memorials. Traveling in virtual space, we will visit the historic Mecca flats and the pavilions of the World’s Fair in Chicago, ghosting edifices that grow mythology and deserve to be studied for what they can tell us about trends in urban planning, architectural tastes and community response.

Distance Learning Courses for Online Learners

CRN 26292

Instructor: Dr. Jason Parry

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/parry.php

Credit Hours: 3
Course Description:
This course is a writing-intensive course in which students learn how to find, evaluate, and use credible information, how to express themselves well in a variety of different written genres, and how to write for different audiences.

This course meets the core requirement for written communication and *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108. Consult your primary advisor.

CRN 25379

Instructor: Dr. Kistrina Bross

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/bross.php

Credit Hours: 1
Course Description:
This 1-credit HONR seminar offers students an opportunity to explore the intellectual wealth of the Honors College Visiting Scholars Program, which is designed to bring esteemed guests from a wide array of fields to Purdue. Every semester, the college hosts a range of visitors from across the disciplines, from scientists, scholars, and artists, to activists, economists, and engineers. Students in the seminar will attend virtual events with these scholars, engage their work and engage with their work. Assignments for the course will include preparing for scholarly visits by researching the background and published work of our guests, attending events in the VSP series, and interacting with the ideas of our visitors through various forms of media output. Students should plan on attending some events outside of class time as part of their effort for the course.

CRN 26799

Instructor: Dr. Natasha Duncan

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/duncan.php

Credit Hours: 2
Course Description:
“Exploring Place” is an experiential learning course in which students examine the cultural, social and historical dynamics that influence communities and relationships within a site. Blending independent study and distance learning, the student and the instructor work together to design an individualized, in-depth study of the place in which the student is located. This study will be attentive to the social, cultural, political, economic, and other forces that have shaped this place historically and contemporaneously, while also focusing on community life and the relationships between residents, institutions, organizations, and others. Exploring Place offers students the opportunity to better understand the people and places around them, expand their worldviews, and increase their self-awareness as they engage within these spaces and understand their positions in them.