HONR Courses

Below is a listing of the Spring 2019 HONR course offerings. Click on the course name to view a description of the course. Please note the HONR 19901/02 Evolutions of Ideas courses are for incoming first year students only; HONR 299, 399, and 499 courses are open to all undergraduate students with a 3.0 GPA or higher.

Click here to download a print-friendly PDF of our Fall 2019's HONR course offerings.

Click here to see all of the Study Away programs.


HONR 199

HONR 19903, CRN 68555, INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO WRITING

Instructor: Dr. J. Peter Moore
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and times: T/TH 1:30-2:45pm
Room: HCRS 1066

Brief Course Description:

Vulgar Eloquence: In every field of expertise, there are ways of doing things that make the experts anxious. From literary studies and musicology to the history of architecture and linguistics, the term vernacular has been applied to those forms of expression that circumvent disciplinary standards. Since vernacular is the site of profound interdisciplinary intervention, it belongs to no single branch of knowledge and has no consistent definition. But it is exactly this complexity, this messiness, that makes it so attractive to writers, artists and intellectuals interested in thinking beyond the boundaries of their vocation. In this course we will examine closely the creative life of the outsider, in the various forms it takes, from graffiti and indigenous building practices to slang and folk medicine. We will track the term across time, beginning with Varo’s De Lingua Latina (47-45 B.C.), moving to the medieval era with Dante’s De Vulgari Eloquentia (1302), before considering its emergence in modern times. We will ask the following questions: Does resistance precede standardization or vice versa? Is there a link between the various definitions of the vernacular? How has the vernacular been used to fashion myths of exclusionary nationalism? What is the nature of broken beauty? As a writing course, we will use the example of vernacular speech to think critically about the standards of essay writing, in hopes that we might challenge those standards by harnessing the power of the voice.

HONR 19903, CRN 23000, INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO WRITING

Instructor: Dr. Jason Parry
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and times: T/TH 3:00-4:15pm
Room: HCRS 1054

Brief Course Description:

Proposals for Planetary Design: From the oxygen-rich atmosphere produced in the earth’s early history by cyanobacteria to the carbon-rich atmosphere produced by industrial civilization, our planet has been thoroughly designed by bio-technical processes. But much of this design has taken place haphazardly, thoughtlessly. In this course, we will learn to look at reality in what the architect Alejandro Aravena calls “a proposal key” and mobilize the written word as a tool for formulating, critiquing, and revising design ideas at varying levels of scale. Given the thorough entanglement of technological, economic, and political structures in our contemporary world system, this course will use the lens of design to think constructively about global problems encompassing diverse realms of knowledge. We will strive to develop both the humility to seek out design solutions in the vast archive of human and natural history and the boldness to propose something radically new.

HONR 299

HONR 29900, CRN 16365, LEARNING ACROSS DIFFERENCES

Instructor: Dr. Nathan Swanson
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: W 3:30-4:20pm
Room: HCRN 1145

Brief Course Description:

This course focuses on the development of intercultural awareness, intercultural attitudes, and intercultural skills, including communication, leadership, and empathy, through engagement with events, centers, and resources available at Purdue. This course is ideal for students wanting to broaden leadership capacities, those preparing for or returning from Study Away experiences, or those seeking to improve intercultural competencies for living and working in a diverse world. While individual intercultural development goals will be realized through personal experiences and reflections, they will be supported by class discussions and course readings. We will discuss, for example, theories about culture and cultural processes, while also considering the role of culture in producing our everyday spaces and shaping our everyday lives. The four Honors College pillars (interdisciplinary academics, leadership development, community and global experiences, and undergraduate research) will help to frame our conversations and experiences, as we consider ways that intercultural competence supports scholarly and personal development in each of these areas.

HONR 29900, CRN 22319, RESEARCH NETWORKS

Dr. Katie Jarriel
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: M/W 11:30am-12:20pm
Room: HCRS 1066

Brief Course Description:

This course provides an introduction to interdisciplinary research so that Honors College students will be prepared to undertake the Scholarly Project. This course also provides hands-on opportunities to build your Honors cohort and to forge connections with other Honors College students and faculty, as well as with the students, faculty, and resources of Purdue as a whole. You will learn how to conduct interdisciplinary research by listening to guest faculty and student speakers; visiting labs, libraries, and workshops on campus; and attending departmental events. At the end of this course, you will have established your own research network at Purdue. Your final project will be to illustrate your individual research network, detailing the people and resources that will help you succeed in your undergraduate research endeavors.

Enrollment in this course is limited to newly admitted continuing students.

This course meets for the first 8 weeks of the Fall 2019 semester

HONR 29900, CRN 20110, VISITING SCHOLARS SEMINAR

Instructor: Dr. Anna Ochs
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: T/TH 4:30-5:20pm
Room: HCRN 1145

Brief Course Description:

If you believe that variety is the spice of life, then this course is for you. Experience up-close and hands-on the phenomenal research and creative ventures that our Visiting Scholars program brings to the Honors College. Think about the world in new ways, and explore the vast expanse of interdisciplinary discoveries at Purdue. Assignments will include presentations, reflections, and projects directly related to our visiting scholars’ expertise.

HONR 29900, CRN 20428, INTERDISCIPLINARY PROBLEM SOLVING

Instructor: Dr. James Tanoos
# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: F 9:30-11:20am
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM Lab)

Brief Course Description:

This course will present case-based dilemmas and convene in-class teams to critically analyze an array of social and organizational challenges. Team projects will require time-sensitive, interdisciplinary, collaborative efforts to create and deliver solutions that address the predicaments. This course integrates concepts from several perspectives, including leadership, the humanities, technical content, design thinking, and current events. It engages students in an applied approach to classroom pedagogy.

HONR 399

HONR 39900, CRN 20111, CRITICAL DATA STUDIES

Instructors:
Dr. Kendall Roark
Dr. Laura Zanotti

# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 1:30-2:45pm
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM Lab)

Brief Course Description:

Critical Data Studies (CDS) is an interdisciplinary field that addresses the ethical, legal, socio-cultural, epistemological and political aspects of data science, big data and digital infrastructure. This course focuses on current topics in critical data studies scholarship. In this iteration of the course, particular emphasis will be given to democratic and participatory approaches to algorithm design and responsible data management, curation and dissemination. Students will develop tools and methods to help scholars think critically and engage the public in conversation about the role of Data Science in society.

This is a reading and writing intensive course.
This course is open to 2019-2020 Critical Data Studies – Data Mine Learning Community Participants only.

HONR 39900, CRN 16359, HUMAN REDESIGN

Instructor: Dr. Adam Watkins
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 3:00-4:15pm
Room: HCRN 1145

Brief Course Description:

What does it mean to be human? What place do humans occupy in the grand scheme of things? Are all humans equal? Consider for a moment that in 1800, the answers to these question differed greatly from what people generally believe today. This was a time before psychology, neurology, and sociology were established disciplines; it was a time of quack theories, mad science, and the birth of science fiction.

By exploring key discoveries and great literary works, students will discover how science and the arts collaborated in a radical redesign of the human subject across the nineteenth century. For instance, students will explore how R.L Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde drew from cutting-edge psychological research, and how Charles Darwin incorporated nineteenth-century narrative tricks into On the Origin of Species to make his theory more palatable. The class is strongly discussion based, and students will participate in exciting projects geared around their individual interests, including the invention of their own quack theory and the creation of a short horror story based on cutting-edge scientific research, after the model of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

HONR 39900, CRN 16328, THE CASE FOR ETHICS

Instructor: Prof. Cara Putman
# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: M/W 10:30-11:20am
Room: HCRN 1143

Brief Course Description:

We live in an age where the 24 hour news cycle and the viral nature of social media challenge individuals and companies to address problems correctly and immediately. The time to deliberate the right approach for a problem is before the crisis occurs. A cursory review of headlines from national and international news outlets demonstrates the current need for leaders to think critically about their ethical standards. Purdue graduates should be well prepared to demonstrate incredible personal integrity and apply a well-prepared ethical framework in all circumstances but especially while in the bright spotlight of national media attention. Not every issue will rise to what passes as the front page of the electronic paper, but Purdue will continue to provide leadership to inspire students to apply strong, ethical standards to their lives.

HONR 39900, CRN 16348, SCENES OF CRIME & DEATH

Instructors:
Dr. Trevor Stamper
Dr. Krystal Hans

# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 12:00-1:15pm
Room: HCRN 1143

Brief Course Description:

Investigators face four scenes when they examine a crime: 1) the scene the perpetrator creates, 2) the scene the investigator recovers, 3) the scene sent for analysis, and 4) the scene the courtroom sees in testimony. The ability to accurately depict what happened is dependent upon the investigator being able to understand what is relevant to a scene. This interdisciplinary course will involve project-based learning, with students working in teams and consulting with forensic professionals.

In this course, students will examine this issue by researching and creating their own mock scenarios and scenes. Students will envision a crime scenario and the scene it would leave behind by: 1) reviewing actual crime scenes case studies, 2) reviewing scene documentation techniques, 3) researching the forensic techniques relevant to their fictional crime scenarios, and 4) working with local forensic professionals as well as effects experts to produce a realistic mock scene.

Then, students will be challenged with documenting a competing team’s mock scene to see how well they can interpret and recover relevant information from a scene. Their efforts will be recorded through standard scene documentation procedures (scene sketching, photographs, documentation, notes, videography). Scenes will also be captured in three dimensions so that teams can understand how well they recovered the relevant information, and explore what irrelevant information led them astray. The ultimate goal of this course is to allow students to organically explore various forensic sub-disciplines and the scientific methods used to document and present their efforts.

HONR 39900, CRN 16317, DEAD MEDIA

Instructors:
Dr. Matthew Hannah
Ms. Carly Dearborn

# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 10:30-11:45am
Room: STEW 462

Brief Course Description:

Media is the hallmark of life in the latter half of the twentieth century. Since the advent of personal computing and electronics, media of various sorts have increasingly played a role in American life. But as new media appear and thrive, older forms of media die and fade from our daily experience. This course will resuscitate these dead media and explore their inner workings, their place in American culture, and their afterlives in art, film and literature. As a class, we will perform an archaeology of media, digging into past technologies, consoles, interfaces, hardware, software, tools, and equipment. We will experience the materiality of dead media through hands-on projects and assignments, but we will also explore the rich scholarship on and theory about media.

HONR 39900, CRN 16333, EUGENICS: THEN & NOW

Instructors:
Dr. Maren Linett
Dr. Zahra Tehrani

# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: M/W/F 1:30-2:20pm
Room: WALC 3148

Brief Course Description:

In 1883, Sir Francis Galton coined the term “eugenics” to refer to the attempts in law, policy, science, and medicine to improve the human “stock” through encouraging “fit” people to breed and discouraging or preventing “unfit” people from breeding. American and British eugenics programs drew the attention, interest, and praise of the Nazis, who took eugenics to an extreme that tainted the concept of eugenics. Now, however, many philosophers call for a “new, liberal eugenics,” arguing that we can avoid the pitfalls of the “old eugenics” if we put certain safeguards in place. Again, they call for shaping the human gene pool to improve human lives and societies. One of the ways the new eugenics is beginning to play out is in genetic enhancement.

Three years ago, researchers in China reported the creation of the first genetically modified human embryo using a new DNA editing technology called CRISPR-Cas9. This has sparked a fiery debate among scientists as well as concerned citizens. Some have called for this research to stop while others believe there is a moral obligation to prevent heritable diseases in future generations. In this course, students will learn about the history of eugenics; read literary representations of eugenic thinking and of “unfit” people; and read scientific and bioethical writing about the new eugenics and its potential benefits and pitfalls. The main aim for the course will be to educate ourselves about this unprecedented technology and its social, ethical, and legal implications.

HONR 39900, CRN 16371, GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES

Instructor: Dr. Dwaine Jengelley
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 3:00-4:15pm
Room: HCRS 1066

Brief Course Description:

If you have an interest in tackling complex global problem, then Global Development Challenges is the course for you. We live in an era defined by some as hyper-globalization where problems transcend national borders, and by extension, solutions require global responses. Whether we are addressing protecting the environment, maintaining democratic stability, AI replacing traditional labor forces, global development, or preparing K12 students for the jobs of the future, societies across the world face complex problems. In this course, students have the opportunity to design viable solutions to global policy challenges through team-based approaches to problem-solving.

Upon completion of this course, students will gain research experience; consult with subject matter specialists; communicate research to an interdisciplinary audience; and have a greater appreciation of the benefits of working with a diverse group of scholars on complex problems. Improved team building, writing and presentation skills are also foundational to the course.

HONR 39900, CRN 16377, HUMAN/ANIMAL GRIEF EXPERIENCES

Instructors:
Dr. Nadine Dolby
Dr. Heather Servaty-Seib

# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: W/F 9:30-10:20am
Room: HCRN 1143
This course meets October 16 - December 6, 2019

Brief Course Description:

What do humans experience when a loved one dies? What do animals experience? This one-credit course takes a multifaceted interdisciplinary approach to understanding how sentient beings, both human and animal, experience death and the process of grief and bereavement. The course draws on research from multiple fields, including psychology, sociology, anthropology, veterinary medicine, nursing, education, and anthrozoology (the study of the human-animal bond). The course investigates how humans experience of the death of other humans and companion animals, and how animals experience the death of human companions, and other animals.

HONR 39900, CRN 16436, THE HOLOCENE

Instructor: Dr. Elizabeth Brite
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 12:00-1:15pm
Room: HCRS 1066

Brief Course Description:

The Holocene is the geologic epoch of the last 11,700 years. It is a period of stable and warm climate that has witnessed the growth of human civilizations worldwide – all written history, cities and urban life, complex technologies, and states and empires have arisen exclusively during this period. Why? The favorable environmental conditions of the Holocene have allowed us to transform the environment and exploit its resources to an extreme degree, principally through production practices based in agriculture. In this course, we will explore this relationship between climate, environment, and the development of human societies throughout the geologic epoch of the Holocene. A principle focus will be the critical role that agriculture has played in the development of our species and in accelerating our impacts on Earth’s ecosystems. In addition to surveying this deep history, students will engage in new knowledge creation about the Holocene through ethnographic research and writing. Together as a class, we will address the current debate about the Holocene’s end – the idea that humanity’s abilities to transform the environment have become so significant and so extreme that they are driving the Earth system into a new epoch. In particular, students will observe and consider agriculture’s ongoing evolution and impacts on the environment and its role in broader systems of anthropogenic change.

HONR 39900, CRN 16326, PRIVATE SELVES & PUBLIC PERSONAE

Instructor: Dr. Daniel Kelly
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 10:30-11:45am
Room: HCRN 1143

Brief Course Description:

What makes you distinctively and uniquely you? How can you be a part of the same person as the 7-year-old version of yourself, given how much you’ve physically and mentally changed? How are the inner, subjective parts of yourself related to the many different faces you present to the various social worlds you move through? How should they be related? What are the special features of human minds that maintain our identities and enable us to juggle these different aspects of ourselves? How can ideals like authenticity and sincerity help us to better manage the coordination of the private and public facets of ourselves? What was Emerson suggesting when he famously claimed that a foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds?

Where is a self, and where does it come from? How much of your identity is given, and how much is chosen, constructed, and achieved? What form does the given part take? How much of the construction part is done in collaboration with friends, family, and other people? What are the construction materials? Where do they come from, and what exactly do you use them to do? How does our contemporary culture shape the space of options you have to choose from? How did we get to this current moment in history, with its individualistic values and buffet of modern kinds of selves? How did the modern ideals of liberty, unfettered choice, personal freedom, and individual responsibility coalesce into their current form and achieve their current cultural prominence? What are today’s most striking manifestations of the deep seated and distinctively American values of rugged individualism and self-reliance? How have technological advances like social media transformed the challenges that stand in the way of fully and successfully following Nietzsche’s famous exhortation to Become Who You Are?

This course will develop some conceptual resources for answering these questions. We’ll draw on work by philosophers, cognitive scientists, anthropologists, cultural and literary historians, cultural evolutionists, and contemporary essayists to help us grapple with these issues. They are all necessary, because questions don’t get much bigger than these, and they are deeply challenging, intellectually puzzling and deeply personal all at once.

HONR 39900, CRN 16316, RUSSIAN ROCKETS & SPACE

Instructors:
Dr. Alina Alexeenko
Dr. Olga Lyanda-Geller

# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: M/W/F 2:30-3:20pm
Room: HCRN 1143

Brief Course Description:

Students taking this multidisciplinary course will learn about space exploration history and current space technologies while simultaneously gaining a basic proficiency in the Russian language. The discovery and exploration of outer space has often been spurred by geopolitical rivalries with the “Space Race” between the USA and the USSR stimulating technological breakthroughs and producing ample historical artifacts. These artifacts as well as resulting differing technological solutions will be examined in this course in the format of team-based projects and case studies. The course will feature working with authentic Russian space program materials, including texts, documents, videos, anecdotes and other cultural resources. A number of invited speakers from various scientific fields and the humanities, including several native Russian speakers, will introduce a wide range of historical and technological topics and the associated Russian language vocabulary.

HONR 39900, CRN 16500, WELL BEING

Instructor: Dr. Jason Ware
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 9:00-10:15am
Room: HCRS 1066

Brief Course Description:

Tokyo, Berlin, Vienna, Copenhagen, and Munich are the five most liveable cities in the world according to Monocle’s 2016 Quality of Life index. They are the highest ranking cities when using metrics to measure crime, emergency services’ response time, transportation networks, cycling culture, food, drink, retail, and the number of independent bookshops. Monocle’s Quality of Life survey is merely one among the many that exist to rank the world’s best cities, but wealth is one theme that emerges from among the varying indecies and their respective results. The metrics, indeed the participants responding to the metrics, represent populations of people with high levels of discretionary income. How might the metrics reflect different values if these indices include a different kind of participant, such as the urban poor? Our goal in this course is to investigate indicators of community well-being related to quality of life with urban poor communities. The underlying premise is that urban poor communities across the globe – living even in Tokyo, Berlin, Vienna, Copenhagen, and Munich – have negligible influence in determining the criteria for measuring a city’s livability. We’ll imagine that material realities of poverty manifest in issues of failing infrastructure and poor living conditions that compromise healthy living, and that social realities manifest in decreased educational attainment and outcomes. All of which suggests that urban poor communities may produce collectively a set of metrics, of indicators, that create a different picture of what it looks like to live within urban environments. We’ll plan to work with urban poor communities within the Greater Lafayette area to create and capture these indicators, the result of which will be a set of inclusive indicators for influencing policy and producing enhanced local future outcomes and community wellbeing.

HONR 39900, CRNs 16394/16403, HITCHCOCK IN THE CITY: THE MAKING OF URBAN SUSPENSE

Instructor: Dr. Megha Anwer
# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: T/TH 10:30-11:45am
Room: HCRS 1066
This course meets August 19 - October 15, 2019
This course has an online component in addition to lecture.

Brief Course Description:

This course explores the films of Alfred Hitchcock – the “Master of Suspense.” Hitchcock, who directed films for over five decades, has been touted as the last Victorian and the first Modernist auteur (cinematic author). In a sense, then, his films chart the making and unmaking of the 20th century in the West. Through a close analysis of films such as The Lodger, Psycho, Birds, Rope, Rear Window, Rebecca, Dial M for Murder, Shadow of Doubt, Notorious, North By North West, Strangers on a Train and Vertigo we will ask: how do these film-texts reconceive the very meaning and nature of modern crime, murder and mystery? We will also explore how the aesthetic developments in his films between the 1920s to the 1970s point not only to improvements in cinematic technology but also to shifts in his political-cinematic preoccupations. While much has been written and discussed about the far reaching influence that his style had on Hollywood (popularly called the “Hitchcock-Effect”), the problematic depiction of gender, sexuality, criminality and deviancy in his films, – all of which we too will study – what receives less attention is the way in which Hitchcock manufactured a whole new way of depicting urban spaces.

One of our primary concerns, then, will be to study Alfred Hitchcock’s filmography for its remarkable achievement in mapping of the city – as the spatial context and condition of urban crime. The city is not just a passive ‘backdrop’ to crime in Hitchcock’s films – the city in fact becomes a key agent and provocateur, a major dramatis persona in the occurrence of crime. We will, thus, explore the status of the Hitchcockian image by arguing that in Hitchcock the visual is the urban. Be it the opening sequence of Frenzy where the strangled naked body of a woman floats up the Thames in London, be it the glorious yet somehow strange and sinister Manhattan skyline ominously visible from inside the apartment in Rope, or be it the surreal undulations of a foggy San Francisco landscape in Vertigo – the visible geography of the city in each case is what draws us into a potentially violent modernity. Narrativizing the city, then, is to narrativize our cultural psyche, where our identities correspond to the material urban surfaces we traverse, brush against, and are remodeled by. The cinematic city is as fundamental to Hitchcock’s work as the genre of violent crime is: the irreducible co-dependency of the two is what really makes Hitchcock tick. Without the city, there would be no Hitchcock crime thriller as we know it. Without Hitchcock’s crime-thrillers, we wouldn’t have as rich an understanding of urban spaces as we do!

The 2-credit course will have an online-component which will entail you watching the films for class; access to films will be given on Blackboard.

HONR 39900, CRNs 16493/16494, POETRY BY DESIGN

Instructor: Dr. J. Peter Moore
# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: T/TH 3:00pm-4:15pm
Room: HCRS 1076 (STEAM Lab)
This course meets August 19 - October 15, 2019
This course has an online component in addition to lecture.

Brief Course Description:

When we talk about what separates poetry from other forms of language we often focus on diction, rhyme and emotional intensity. But more often than not what distinguishes the poem from the legal contract or newspaper article is the way it looks. This is a course about that look. This is a course where we empower the page. We will study the conventions that govern the design of printed poetry, focusing particularly on the history of the broadside. Defined simply as a sheet of paper bearing a printed message on the front, the broadside has roots in military and political history but in the contemporary moment most often refers to an illustrated, limited edition poem, often featuring the author’s signature. Our hands-on study of the broadside will offer students an opportunity to create their own posters using the vintage letterpress technology in the Honors College Print Bay. By the end, students will receive instruction in the following skills: grid layout, typesetting, form lock-up, make-ready, press operation, plate etching, press maintenance as well as all relevant safety procedures. In addition to the in-class experiential learning format, students will have the opportunity to curate an online conversation, addressing various examples of broadside art. Final projects will be prominently displayed in local cafes on and around the Purdue campus. While no previous experience is necessary, students with an interest in visual composition, text-based art and creative expression are encouraged to enroll.

HONR 39900, CRNs 16467/16473, POP CULTURE CLASSICS

Instructor: Dr. Katie Jarriel
# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: T/TH 10:30-11:45am
Room: HCRS 1066
This course meets October 16 - December 6, 2019
This course has an online component in addition to lecture.

Brief Course Description:

The mythological traditions of ancient Greece and Rome have had a lasting impact on the past two millennia; popular culture in the 21st century is still suffused with references to classical themes. In "Pop Culture Classics," we will examine how pop culture—including movies, literature, music, art, and digital media—has interpreted, re-imagined, and recontextualized the literary and material record of classical Greece and Rome.

We will explore themes in the contemporary reception of classical works such as Herodotus' Histories and Orientalism in Frank Miller's 300, the Pygmalion myth and sci-fi horror films, and epic journeys from Homer's Odyssey to Mad Max: Fury Road. We will challenge the stereotypical notion of “western civilization” by analyzing the varying identities of people in the ancient world through discussion of themes like slavery, gender, ethnicity, and politics.

This 2-credit course will include an online component: students will contribute to an online discussion board prior to in-class meetings. For the final project, the class will collectively produce a blog juxtaposing classical and pop culture media.

HONR 499

HONR 49900, CRN 20543, INSTITUTIONAL DATA RESEARCH

Instructor: Dr. David Nelson
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: M 3:30–4:20pm
Room: HCRN 1145

Brief Course Description:

HONR 499 is a two-part course available for Honors College students. There are no pre-requisites and the course is open to students at all classification levels. The course engages students directly in the research process through analysis of a wide variety institutional data that Purdue has collected. Working with faculty mentors, students use these data to answer research questions with practical implications for their peers and future students at Purdue. Drawing on Purdue’s Data Science Initiatives, students in this course will learn the basics of data research, how to create a research question, explore scholarly literature, test hypotheses and how data analysis can provide answers to questions about the student learning experience at a higher education institution like Purdue. This class provides an introduction to research with large data sets. However, this is not a class on statistical methods, and no previous knowledge of data analysis is required, though any background with research projects is helpful. If you are the type of person who is interested in data science and likes to propose questions and explore them with guidance from research faculty, this might be the course for you.

The class meets once weekly, for 50 minutes in the fall semester, and monthly during the spring semester. In the spring semester, students spend additional arranged time completing their projects with a faculty mentor, the HONR 499 instructor, and members of Purdue’s Office of Institutional Research, Assessment and Evaluation.

HONR 49900, CRN 20401, WOMEN & THE GENDER REVOLUTION AT PURDUE

Instructor: Dr. Nancy Gabin
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 1:30-2:45pm
Room: STEW 462

Brief Course Description:

The second half of the twentieth century brought a world of change to women’s lives and American ideas about gender. Life magazine declared it “the revolution that will affect everybody.” Others likened it to a “tidal wave” or proclaimed the “world split open”. This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to historical research and writing by focusing on women and the gender revolution at Purdue University. As we move from Baby Boomers to Generation Z, we will consider the social, political, economic, and cultural dynamics of the gender revolution for women students, faculty, and staff at Purdue. We will ask if and how this revolution changed at Purdue: the meanings and understandings of gender; the meanings and significance of family, motherhood, and personal relationships; women’s education and female employment; women’s involvement in political and social organizations; expressions and regulations of female sexuality; and women and popular culture. We will investigate this still unknown and unwritten history using the holdings of the Purdue University Archives and Special Collections. These include club and organizational records, printed publications such as the Debris and the Purdue Exponent, personal collections, photographs and films, administrative files, course catalogs and syllabi, interviews and oral histories, and material culture sources. We will also seek information and material on groups and individuals not yet represented in the Archives and Special Collections. We can explore women’s changing relationship to sports and athletics, for example, looking at everything from cheerleaders, twirlers, band members, and the dance team to the growth of intermural women’s athletic programs such as volleyball, basketball, and softball. The integration of women as students and as faculty into male-dominated disciplines is another important topic, as is the development of gender-focused curricula and research and the advent of programs such as Women’s Studies. The impact of Title IX at Purdue merits attention not only for its implementation in athletics but also its consequences for all academic programs. As we investigate these and other themes, we will bring to bear on our research and discussions the insights offered by such disciplines as history, sociology, media studies, women’s and gender studies, and archives and information science. The course will offer opportunities for students to practice and publish archival research in both digital and hard copy formats. These productions will allow students to explore the extensive materials in the archives, deepen experiential learning, and highlight student research.

FALL BREAK STUDY OPPORTUNITIES

HONR 29900, CRN 19778, ARCHITECTURE OF CHICAGO

Instructor: Dr. Pete Moore

# of Credit Hours: 1
Dates: October 5-8, 2019 (Fall Break)

Brief Course Description:

The city of Chicago is synonymous with architectural feats of wonder. But as much as it is the setting for innovative design and poetic dwelling, it is also the scene of built problems, a city commonly criticized for its neglect of public housing as well as its segregative plans for urban renewal. This four-day course will engage with these issues through an immersive tour of architectural sites in Chicago. We will explore the city’s landmarks, including a boat tour of iconic lakeshore landmarks. We will focus on the work of famed architect Mies van der Rohe, examining his contributions to the Illinois Institute of Technology campus. Finally, we will move into the contemporary moment, with a guided survey of the work of Theaster Gates, an artist committed to rescuing buildings in the predominantly black Southside neighborhoods, turning them into communal spaces for creative endeavor.

The approximate cost for this study tour is $500 which includes transportation, lodging, and some meals.

HONR 29900, CRN 16440, RADICAL SOUTH

Instructor: Dr. Megha Anwer

# of Credit Hours: 1
Dates: October 5-8, 2019 (Fall Break)

Brief Course Description:

This four day Fall break course to Alabama will be an intense and radicalizing foray into the long history of resistance that the South has mounted against the forces and institutions of slavery, Jim Crow and the New Jim Crow. We will visit the cities of Montgomery, Selma and Birmingham as we revisit the key moments and people who launched and sustained the Civil Rights Movement. At the same time, it will also be crucial to our exploration of the “Radical South” that we learn not only about the biggest, most popular names identified with the movement, but also to recover the names, stories and legacies of the ordinary people – working class men, women and children – who staked their lives in the fight for racial equality and justice in the United States. In particular, we will focus on the creative, compelling and collaborative ways in which communities in Alabama have decided to tell their stories – whether through state-funded institutions like the Legacy Museum or through local efforts such as the “Footprints to Freedom Tour.” Join Dr. Megha Anwer and Melissa Gruver in what promises to be an eye-opening and transformative experience.

The approximate cost for this study tour is $1,000 which includes transportation, lodging and some meals.