HONR Courses

Below is a listing of the Spring 2021 HONR course descriptions.

Click here to download a print-friendly PDF of our Spring 2021's HONR course descriptions.

Click here to download the schedule of our Spring 2021's HONR 19902 course offerings.


CRN 69810

Instructor: Dr. Megha Anwer, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/anwer.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T 10:30 – 11:45 AM (HCRS 1076) & TH 10:30 – 11:45 AM (online)
Course Description:
This course is a writing-intensive course in which students learn how to find, evaluate, and use credible information, how to express themselves well in a variety of different written genres, and how to write for different audiences. This course meets the core requirement for written communication and *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108. Consult your primary advisor.

CRN 23545/27578

Instructor: Dr. Nathan Swanson, Postdoctoral Fellow for International Education, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/swanson.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T 1:30 – 2:45 PM (HCRS 1076) and Online Asynchronous
Course Description:
This course focuses on the development of intercultural awareness, intercultural attitudes, and intercultural skills, including communication, leadership, and empathy, through engagement with events, centers, and resources at Purdue and online. Additionally, a virtual exchange component will offer students practice in communicating across cultures, experiencing new perspectives, and appreciating cultural differences. This course is ideal for students wanting to broaden leadership capacities, those planning to participate in Study Away experiences, or those seeking to improve intercultural competencies for living and working in a diverse world. Individual intercultural development goals will be realized through personal experiences and reflections and supported by class discussions and course readings. The four Honors College pillars will help to frame our conversations and experiences, as we consider ways that intercultural competence supports scholarly and personal development in each of these areas.

CRN 23546

Instructor: Cara Putman, MBA and JD, Krannert School of Management Honors Director

https://krannert.purdue.edu/directory/bio.php?username=cputman

Credit Hours: 1
Days/Times: T 12:30 – 1:20 PM (HCRS 1076)
Course Description:
Every semester, our campus hosts a changing line-up of distinguished leaders from various realms, from CEOs and politicians to university presidents. This 1-credit HONR seminar offers students the opportunity to hone their ideas about leadership and to reflect on their own leadership goals by engaging the ideas of these campus guests. Students in the seminar will attend talks and events with these visitors, whose work they will engage on numerous levels, from preparatory research to final reflection. The goal of this seminar is to launch students on their own leadership paths by allowing them to analyze and reflect upon the pathways that visiting leaders have taken on their road to Purdue. Students should plan on attending some events outside of class time as part of their effort for the course.

CRN 28814

Instructor: Dr. Alex Francis, Associate Professor of Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences

https://www.purdue.edu/hhs/slhs/spacelab/dr-alexander-l-francis/

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: M/F 2:30 – 3:20 PM (HCRS 1076) & W 2:30 – 3:20 PM (Online)
Course Description:
In the past 15-20 years, researchers in the human sciences have identified a “replication crisis,” suggesting that much of the research conducted in the social and life sciences may be completely unreliable. Many published studies cannot be replicated—their findings may be completely spurious, resulting from a combination of random chance and potentially questionable research practices (QRPs). Proposed solutions have begun to coalesce into a suite of scientific practices often referred to as “open science.” This course will introduce students to the conduct of human subjects research in the social and life sciences with a focus on the current “replication crisis” and the application of methods of open science. Students will read relevant articles while developing and conducting an experimental replication as a class. Consistent with open science methods, the project will be pre-registered, data and methods will be publicly archived. Results will be written up as a poster for presentation at a suitable undergraduate research forum.

CRN 27184

Instructors: Dr. Andy Buchanan, Assistant Professor of Computer Graphics Technology

https://polytechnic.purdue.edu/profile/buchan25

Dr. Sigrid Zahner, Associate Professor of Art & Design

https://www.cla.purdue.edu/facultyStaff/profiles/promoted/promotions-15/Zahner._Sigrid.html

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: W 1:30 – 5:20 PM (PAO 1115)
Course Description:
This course focuses on the development of intercultural awareness, intercultural attitudes, and intercultural skills, including communication, leadership, and empathy, through engagement with events, centers, and resources at Purdue and online. Additionally, a virtual exchange component will offer students practice in communicating across cultures, experiencing new perspectives, and appreciating cultural differences. This course is ideal for students wanting to broaden leadership capacities, those planning to participate in Study Away experiences, or those seeking to improve intercultural competencies for living and working in a diverse world. Individual intercultural development goals will be realized through personal experiences and reflections and supported by class discussions and course readings. The four Honors College pillars will help to frame our conversations and experiences, as we consider ways that intercultural competence supports scholarly and personal development in each of these areas.

CRN 23551

Instructors: Dr. Gary Bertoline, Dean of the Purdue Polytechnic Institute

https://polytechnic.purdue.edu/profile/bertolig

Dr. Patrick Connolly, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs and Learning Innovation, Purdue Polytechnic Institute

https://polytechnic.purdue.edu/profile/connollp

Credit Hours: 1
Days/Times: TH 12:30 – 1:20 PM (HCRS 1076) & T 12:30 – 1:20 PM (Online)
This course meets January 19 – March 12, 2021.
Course Description:
This course will prepare students to succeed as students and in their professional lives. Students will learn techniques to organize their day and week, set realistic short- and long-term goals, stay on top of their field, and lead a less stressful and happier professional and personal life. The courses will also provide insights into personal strengths and how to focus those strengths to be the best every day. Students will develop a philosophy for life to know what matters to them and why.

CRN 23548/27813

Instructor: Dr. Elizabeth Brite, Clinical Associate Professor, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/brite.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T 4:30 – 5:45 PM (HCRS 1076) and online asynchronously
Course Description:
Study abroad is an experience meant to introduce students to new cultural contexts, but, there are often real barriers that limit the possibilities of places we can go. The turn towards virtual learning in the contexts of COVID-19 opens new opportunities to “study abroad” in places that are hard to reach. This course will provide a virtual study abroad experience to Central Asia and Afghanistan, an area of the world that is laborious, expensive, and physically prohibitive to travel. As an archaeologist with over fifteen years of experience conducting research in northwestern Uzbekistan, Dr. Brite will be your guide in exploring the archaeology, history, culture, and politics of this region. We will examine a vast array of topics, spanning from the ancient Silk Roads and Alexander the Great, to prevailing themes in colonial and modern Islam, globalization, gender, terrorism, and ethnic conflict. In order to provide you with an embedded cultural experience, you will be guided through a service-learning project in which you will provide English-language tutoring to a student in Afghanistan and build your intercultural competencies through reflection upon this peer-to-peer cross-cultural exchange.

CRN 17329/27711

Instructor: Dr. Zahra Tehrani, Assistant Clinical Professor, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/tehrani.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: TH 3:00 – 4:15 PM (HCRS 1076) and online asynchronously
Course Description:
This interdisciplinary course introduces you biological, psychological and social theories of aging to provide foundational knowledge regarding how and why we age. Given new medical technologies, is it possible that humans will stop aging together? Would that be desirable? What would it mean to be “immortal,” and why do are we drawn to the idea? The biological question of lifespan opens up to (and is informed by) issues of population, resources, policy, family dynamics, and personal well-being. Do you want to live forever? What would the world be like if we did?

CRN 17328

Instructor: Dr. Adam Watkins

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/brite.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T 3:00 – 4:15 PM (HCRS 1076) and online asynchronously
Course Description:
This course will boldly go where no course has gone before, providing students the chance to explore strange new ideas about space and time. Want to write a sequel to Interstellar or your own episode of Star Trek? Want to see how our idea of spacetime has evolved in response to religion, philosophy, and physics? Want to hear Purdue scientists talk about science fiction that matters to them? To study spacetime requires that we engage a variety of perspectives from the past and present. In that sense, HONR 399: Spacetime! is deeply historical and philosophical in its approach. The course also takes an active interest in creative processes behind scientific thought. Students will explore how arts and symbolic thought have played significant roles in scientific discoveries, including Einstein’s. Students will also practice creative modes of inquiry firsthand, as course projects will be based in creative writing practices. [Note: projects will be assessed on critical and creative thinking, not artistic quality.]

CRN 16527

Instructors: Dr. Dwaine Jengelley, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/jengelley.php

Dr. Allison Roberts, Bement Senior Policy Fellow, Purdue Policy Research Institute

https://www.purdue.edu/discoverypark/ppri/about/index.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: TH 10:30 – 11:45 AM (HCRS 1076) and T 10:30 – 11:45 AM (online)
Course Description:
Military and other forms of technologies used in securing society also pose ethical and deadly challenges for the local, national, or international community. In this course, we examine the political, economic, environmental, and psychological impacts of technologies used in the name of national security. We cover topics at the intersection of security, technology, and society. These include national and international weapons policies, the ethics of security measures, terrorism, and the psychological and physical effects of war. The course offers students the opportunity to interact with technological experts, national security professionals, and military service personnel (active duty or veterans). Through team-based and experiential approaches to learning, students will collaborate on the communication of security, technology and society research. Students will create position papers and policy briefs to inform policy makers and decision makers about the societal consequences of national security technologies.

CRN 17265

Instructor: Dr. Jason Ware, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/ware.php

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 9:00 – 10:15 AM (HCRS 1076)
Course Description:
Jazz artists “speak to each other in the language of music.” In “Jazz,” we will explore the nature of this artistic conversation with many of its cultural influences, geographical variations, and temporal iterations, and we will interrogate varying facets of the social impact such a conversation facilitates. Furthermore, we will explore the musical language of jazz with its power to make collective performance stronger both within and beyond music. And we will investigate the ways in which this artists' talk became the "talk of the town" and country as a medium through which people could break from dominant cultures. We will make sense of and process our journey by creating our own metaphorical jazz ensemble, featuring the complex and layered textures of our lives as inspiration for the note and lyric. **You do not need to be a musician to take this course**

CRN 31245

Instructor: Dr. Shannon McMullen, Associate Professor of Visual & Performing Arts

https://cla.purdue.edu/facultyStaff/profiles/promoted/promotions-16/McMullen._Shannon.html

Credit Hours: 1
Days/Times: W 3:30 – 4:20 PM (HCRN 1145)
Course Description:
This 1-credit course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to environmental justice and prepares students for the Environmental Justice Conference hosted by Purdue in March 2020. The course will familiarize students with the work and ideas of conference presenters, create connections across those speakers through a material culture approach, and present an opportunity for students to join an environmental justice laboratory prototyping a digital humanities project.

CRN 23859

Instructors: Dr. Martin Jun, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

https://engineering.purdue.edu/ME/People/ptProfile?resource_id=156378

Dr. Tong Jin Kim, Associate Professor of Industrial Design

https://www.cla.purdue.edu/facultystaff/profiles/new/newfaculty-14/kim._tongjin.html

Credit Hours: 3
Days/Times: T/TH 1:30 – 2:45 PM (HCRS 1076)
Course Description:
In this course, students will solve local community issues by partnering with community organizations. Students will conduct ethnographic research to discover current issues faced by our local community, formulate solutions through the “Design Thinking” process, and implement solutions by partnering with local community organizations.

Distance Learning Courses for Residential Learners

CRN 29164

Instructors: Dr. Rhonda Phillips, Dean, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/phillips.php

Dr. Emily Allen, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/allen.php

Credit Hours: 1
Days/Times: T/TH 5:30 – 6:20 PM (Online)
This course meets January 19 – March 12, 2021.
Course Description:
Join Dean Rhonda Phillips and the deans of Purdue’s disciplinary colleges for a series of conversations about the state of the world, the future of education, and the most important things that university students can learn to prepare themselves for the rest of their lives. This one-credit seminar introduces students to Purdue’s academic leaders and to the vital questions that shape the university experience. The seminar meets twice weekly throughout the first 8 weeks of the semester, and students will produce reflections on the course content as it intersects with their own lives.

CRN 27580

Instructor: Dr. Emily Allen, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/allen.php

Credit Hours: 1
This course meets online asynchronously.
Course Description:
This 1-credit HONR seminar offers students an opportunity to explore the intellectual wealth of the Honors College Visiting Scholars Program, which is designed to bring esteemed guests from a wide array of fields to Purdue. Every semester, the college hosts a range of visitors from across the disciplines, from scientists, scholars, and artists, to activists, economists, and engineers. Students in the seminar will attend virtual events with these scholars, engage their work and engage with their work. Assignments for the course will include preparing for scholarly visits by researching the background and published work of our guests, attending events in the VSP series, and interacting with the ideas of our visitors through various forms of media output. Students should plan on attending some events outside of class time as part of their effort for the course.

CRN 21565

Instructor: Dr. Pete Moore, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/moore.php

Credit Hours: 2
Days/Times: T/TH 3:00 – 4:15 PM (Online)
This course meets March 15 – April 30, 2021.
Course Description:
In 1956, novelist and chemist C.P. Snow published “The Two Cultures,” a short essay in which he drew attention to the widening gap between the sciences and the arts. Aside from perverting the ideals of liberal education, the accepted insularity promoted a world in which the achievements of the arts lacked pragmatic function and the advancements in the sciences lacked a moral conscious. According to Snow, the only solution was to revolutionize the educational system. Such is the goal of this class. While we tend to associate experimentation with the sciences, artists and writers have been drawing upon the language and methods of experimentation since the Enlightenment. This course will offer a survey of that history, looking at early scientific ideas of experimentation and tracing their influence on experimental artists and writers. In the end, this course carries major implications for the question of epistemology, i.e. how is knowledge produced in both the sciences and the art, and what role does experimentation play in this process. Assignments will entail working on a podcast that brings contemporary artists and scientists into conversation about creativity and experimentation. Students will also have the opportunity to work with the professor on an ongoing work of experimental writing.

CRN 27178

Instructor: Dr. David Williams, Professor of Veterinary History

https://vet.purdue.edu/directory/person.php?id=220

Credit Hours: 1
This course meets online asynchronously.
Course Description:
What can be said of the remarkable artworks of buffalo, rhinoceroses, lions, and dark-maned horses Found in the caves of early man? What was their purpose? Who created them, and how? Cats were sacred in Ancient Egypt, and some were mummified. Harming a cat could result in a harsh punishment. In this course students with an interest in these and other questions will study the early origin of man’s fascination with animals from the Paleolithic era, Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, and East and South Asia. Particular attention will be paid to works of art that help demonstrate man’s fascination with animals, and the course of hunting, herding, and domestication. What is domestication, and how did it occur? This course is appropriate for students with no previous study of history or art history. What is required is an interest and curiosity in the subject.

CRN 27179

Instructor: Dr. Jason Parry, Visiting Assistant Professor, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/parry.php

Credit Hours: 3
This course meets online asynchronously.
Course Description:
Zoöp n (2018): zo·öp is short for zoöperation and is a combination of co-op (short for co-operation) and zoë (Greek for ‘life’). It is the name of a new type of cooperative legal entity of which humans as well as multispecies ecological communities can be members. This online course is a collaboration with Het Nieuwe Instituut, a museum for modern architecture, design, and digital culture in Rotterdam. Building on Het Nieuwe Instituut’s “zoöp” project, developed by an international group of artists, programmers, and architects, students will gain first-hand experience in prototyping post-human institutions capable of leveraging technological advances to mitigate environmental degradation. We will explore the potential contributions of artificial intelligence to biodiversity conservation, devise legal innovations that might pave the way for a multispecies constitution, and examine the Netherlands as a terraformed environment. Guest speakers and online workshops will complement readings in algorithmic governance, robot-animal interaction, environmental history, and ecological economics. Together, we’ll experiment with new forms of community that recognize and mobilize multiple nonhuman agencies.

Distance Learning Courses for Online Learners

CRN 26506-OL1

Instructor: Dr. Katie Jarriel

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/jarriel.php

Credit Hours: 3
Course Description:
This course is a writing-intensive course in which students learn how to find, evaluate, and use credible information, how to express themselves well in a variety of different written genres, and how to write for different audiences. This course meets the core requirement for written communication and *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108. Consult your primary advisor.

CRN 28357-OL4

Instructors: Dr. Rhonda Phillips, Dean, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/phillips.php

Dr. Emily Allen, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/allen.php
Credit Hours: 1
This course meets January 19 – March 12, 2021.
Course Description:
Join Dean Rhonda Phillips and the deans of Purdue’s disciplinary colleges for a series of conversations about the state of the world, the future of education, and the most important things that university students can learn to prepare themselves for the rest of their lives. This one-credit seminar introduces students to Purdue’s academic leaders and to the vital questions that shape the university experience. The seminar meets twice weekly throughout the first 8 weeks of the semester, and students will produce reflections on the course content as it intersects their own lives.

CRN 27581-OL3

Instructor: Dr. Emily Allen, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/allen.php
Credit Hours: 1
Course Description:
This 1-credit HONR seminar offers students an opportunity to explore the intellectual wealth of the Honors College Visiting Scholars Program, which is designed to bring esteemed guests from a wide array of fields to Purdue. Every semester, the college hosts a range of visitors from across the disciplines, from scientists, scholars, and artists, to activists, economists, and engineers. Students in the seminar will attend virtual events with these scholars, engage their work and engage with their work. Assignments for the course will include preparing for scholarly visits by researching the background and published work of our guests, attending events in the VSP series, and interacting with the ideas of our visitors through various forms of media output. Students should plan on attending some events outside of class time as part of their effort for the course.

CRN 27579-OL1

Instructor: Dr. Nathan Swanson, Postdoctoral Fellow for International Education, Honors College

https://honors.purdue.edu/about-us/faculty/swanson.php
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description:
This course focuses on the development of intercultural awareness, intercultural attitudes, and intercultural skills, including communication, leadership, and empathy, through engagement with events, centers, and resources at Purdue and online. Additionally, a virtual exchange component will offer students practice in communicating across cultures, experiencing new perspectives, and appreciating cultural differences. This course is ideal for students wanting to broaden leadership capacities, those planning to participate in Study Away experiences, or those seeking to improve intercultural competencies for living and working in a diverse world. Individual intercultural development goals will be realized through personal experiences and reflections and supported by class discussions and course readings. The four Honors College pillars will help to frame our conversations and experiences, as we consider ways that intercultural competence supports scholarly and personal development in each of these areas.