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HONR Courses


Fall 2022 Course Offerings

Please visit the online schedule of classes for the course reference numbers (CRNs) and other relevant course registration information.


Instructor: Dr. Pete Moore, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

J. Peter Moore - Honors College - Purdue University

Credit Hours: 3

 

Course Description:

This course covers the fundamentals of college writing by inviting students to develop communication skills through supporting the growth of small press community in the Honors College. Small press typically refers to the organizational efforts of independent publishers, who use their comparatively limited resources to identify and disseminate works that would otherwise fall between the cracks of the publishing industry. While we will consider the ways in which small presses have utilized digital media to support their missions, our primary focus is print-based initiatives. In order to understand contemporary independent press activity, we will study not only the history of print technology but also the concept of print culture. The class will draw its readings from the interdisciplinary field of print studies, which engages the fields of history, industrial engineering, literature, art history, political philosophy and visual design. Students will also get the opportunity to directly contribute to the Honors College’s own center for the study of print, the Print Bay. Writing assignments will be designed around the needs of the Print Bay.

Students will be given the hands-on experience of producing practical materials that will help stimulate enthusiasm for print on campus and promote the Print Bay within a national network of small presses.

This course is a writing-intensive course in which students learn how to find, evaluate, and use credible information, how to express themselves well in a variety of different written genres, and how to write for different audiences. This course meets the core requirement for written communication and *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108.  Consult your primary advisor.

Instructors: Nathan Swanson, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College
Nathan Swanson - Honors College - Purdue University

Credit Hours: 2


Course Description:

In this course, students from Purdue University (West Lafayette, Indiana) and Unisinos (Porto Alegre, Brazil) will collaborate virtually in interdisciplinary teams to identify solutions to a major global challenge. At the start of the course, students at both universities will meet together to learn about the topic from a range of disciplinary perspectives through guest lectures, assigned readings, and class discussions. Students will then be divided into interdisciplinary teams with members from both universities and provided a prompt related to the theme. Teams will spend the remainder of the course focused on researching, developing, and packaging their solutions, which they will present publicly at the end of the term. In addition to increasing knowledge of the topic and improving teamwork skills, students in this course will advance in intercultural knowledge, skills, and attitudes through their international collaborative experience. *Those completing this course will be given first priority to enroll in a subsidized study abroad program to Porto Alegre over the subsequent Spring Break period for additional credit.*

Instructor: Kristen Bellisario, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

Kristen M Bellisario | Forestry and Natural Resources

Credit Hours: 2


Course Description:

This course is for new members of the Honors College community, who entered as continuing students or transfer student. It is designed to help you hone fundamental learning outcomes of an honors education: interdisciplinary thinking, critical thinking, problem solving, research thinking, collaboration, and global awareness. Through this course, you will also engage with the pillars of the Honors College and develop community within the Honors College.

To accomplish these objectives, the course is simultaneously project-based and experiential. You will work in multi-disciplinary teams on applied research that emphasizes critical and multi-dimensional thinking about real-world problems. Through project-based learning, you will move your skills beyond identifying and understanding a problem to identifying and formulating solutions to that problem. The problem addressed in the course is local or global in scope and has social, economic, political, and/or environmental implications for our local and/or global community. The problem also begs a interdisciplinary, innovative solution.

Continuing in the vein of experiential learning and of building your honors ethos, you will attend events (some as a class, others individually) and participate in programs that embody the Honors College’s pillars: Community and Global Engagement, Leadership, Research, and Interdisciplinary Academics. You will curate a schedule of events that take place during the semester and reflect on these experiences.

 

Instructor: Adam Watkins, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

Dr. Adam Watkins | Honors College

Credit Hours: 1


Course Description: 
This course is designed for students who are simultaneously enrolled in the College of Engineering's Senior Design project and provides Honors Engineering students a pathway for fulfilling their Honors Scholarly Project. The course will cover teamwork principles and practices based on existing research and scholarship, while also offering students a space to discuss how these concepts apply to their Senior Design teams. In this way, the course adds another educational layer to the Senior Design project, such that project teams become case studies for analyzing a variety of teamwork processes. Students will apply the principles and practices explored in class, thereby exercising their collaboration and leadership competencies while also improving the efficacy of their project team. Throughout the course, students will compose a case study of their team informed by research as well as complete reflections on their own success and future goals as collaborators and leaders.

Instructor: Adam Watkins, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

Dr. Adam Watkins | Honors College

Credit Hours: 1


Course Description: 
Science of Teamwork will provide students with an exciting opportunity to experiment with collaboration principles and strategies through fun teambuilding activities and games. Course content will consist of cutting-edge research on teambuilding, collaborative problem solving, the psychology of groups, as well as the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion. Course work will consist primarily of readings and reflections regarding application of teamwork concepts to in-class activities. At the end of the course, students will work in groups to design and assess their own teambuilding activity based on relevant research.

Instructor: TBD, Honors College

Credit Hours: 1

Course Description: “Exploring Place” is an examination of the cultural, social and historical dynamics that influence communities and relationships of a site. Blending independent study and distance learning, in this experiential learning course, the student and the instructor work together to design an individualized, in-depth study of the place in which the student is located. This study will be attentive to the social, cultural, political, economic, and other forces that have shaped this place historically and today, while also focusing on community life and the relationships between residents, institutions, organizations, and others. Exploring Place offers students the opportunity to better understand the people and places around them, expand their worldviews, and increase their self-awareness as they engage within these spaces and understand their place in them.


Instructor: Adam Watkins, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

Dr. Adam Watkins | Honors College

Credit Hours: 1


This course meets during Fall Break, October 8-11, 2022


Course Description: Honors Leadership Retreat is for honors students who want to take meaningful steps on the path to becoming an exceptional leader. The retreat consists of a highly interactive two-day, one-night stay at Camp Tecumseh over Fall Break. Here, students can explore principles of leadership excellence in a fun, supportive, low-stakes environment, while also making connections with other honors leaders. *There is an additional fee for this course. Students can apply for need-based support.*

Instructor: Muiris MacGiollabhui, Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, Honors College

Muiris MacGiollabhui | Honors College

Credit Hours: 1


This course meets during Fall Break, October 8-11, 2022


Course Description: 
This fall break course will bring students back to the nineteenth century in Chicago at a time of steam engines, robber-barons, and railway strikes. In Chicago, we will explore the lives of laborers, who were often migrants newly arrived in the United States, as they navigated the crushing economic inequality of the Gilded Age. We will explore the rise of labor unions and radical agitators who faced off with men like Rockefeller and Carnegie. The first day will be spent exploring the Driehaus Museum, where students will be tasked with thinking through the cultural and societal forces that brought on the Gilded Age. The second day will be spent in the Pullman Neighborhood investigating how laborers, suffocated by their working conditions, elected to strike, leading to the largest railway strike in US history. On the final day, we will explore the site of the Haymarket Affair, a bombing blamed on European anarchists, and the legal trials that followed. Students will be asked to think about their current historical moment and the commonalities between the present day and the Gilded Age.  *There is an additional fee for this course. Students can apply for need-based support.*

Instructor: Dr. Pete Moore, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

J. Peter Moore - Honors College - Purdue University

Credit Hours: 1

This course meets during Fall Break, October 8-11, 2022

Course Description: This four-day course offers students a hands-on introduction to the Honors College Print Bay, a fully-equipped center for the experiential study of letterpress printing. This vintage method, once the dominant form of industrial printing, has over the past several decades experienced a dramatic revival. At a time when the campus is overwhelmed with posters and flyers that all look the same—with the usual fonts, preset templates and stock images—letterpress introduces into the visual landscape an unmistakably warm and vibrant alternative. A synthesis of art and machine, letterpress is an analog process that allows the user to physically compose layouts, and work within a completely unique set of visual constraints. The resulting prints testify to the beauty of irregularity, the joy of a meditative tactile practice, and the benefits of collaboration. By the end of our course, students will receive instruction in the following skills: grid layout, typesetting, form lock-up, make-ready, press operation, plate etching, press maintenance, and all relevant safety precautions. While no previous experience is necessary, students with an interest visual design, mechanical technology and/or creative expression are encouraged to enroll.

Instructor: Nadine Dolby, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, EDCI

Nadine Dobly - Honors College - Purdue University

Credit Hours: 1

This course meets October 19 – December 10, 2022


Course Description: 
This course will examine facets of the historical and contemporary changing role of pets (companion animals) in U.S. society, with additional focus on global and comparative contexts. The course draws on research from multiple fields, including psychology, sociology, social work, anthropology, law and public policy, veterinary medicine, education, and anthrozoology.

Instructor: Bethany McGowan, Associate Professor, School of Information Studies

Bethany McGowan | Purdue University

                   Matthew Hannah, Assistant Professor, School of Information Studies

Matthew N Hannah | Purdue University

Credit Hours: 3


Course Description: 
For this Diplomacy Lab course, an experiential learning collaboration between Purdue University and the U.S. Department of State, we seek an interdisciplinary range of students to explore solutions to challenges related to the overwhelming quantities of changing information, which provides openings for malicious acts that reduce public trust and sow confusion. Students will engage essential scholarship on information, conduct research related to the spread of mis/dis/malinformation and conspiracy theories in digital environments, and collaboratively draft a policy report that provides an overview of social listening practices. Student research in the course will directly assist diplomats in the State Department's Operations Center identify misinformation, disinformation, and malinformation online and promote authentic and reliable information for the Secretary of State and other senior officials. Students will also design the prototype for a social listening dashboard, like the WHO EARS tool. Students will have various opportunities throughout the semester to discuss their research with State Department officials via video calls and teleconferences. Teams that develop exceptional results and ideas will be acknowledged and may be invited to brief senior State Department officials on their findings. The bid for this project has been accepted by the State Department as one of six competitive Purdue projects.

Instructors: Huachao Mao, Assistant Professor, Engineering Technology

Huachao Mao - Polytechnic Institute - Purdue University
 

Credit Hours: 3


Course Description:
In this course, students will work at the intersection of art, nature and design. We will begin by exploring structures in nature, from the microscale (DNA) to the macroscale (trees, mountains). Inspired by nature, teams will design sculptures, structures, objects, tools, or machines that incorporate aesthetic elements inspired by their exploration and observation of nature—e.g., a tree’s water transpiration system, a hummingbird’s wing. These designs will then be realized through 3-D printing. Various activities include visiting museums and other sites; lectures on nature, arts, engineering, design; an introduction to 3-D printing and lab time with the printers; and exhibitions of students’ work. While some skills will be particularly welcome (familiarity with CAD, for instance), there are no prerequisites for success in this class. We seek to build diverse teams, who will bring together their personal experiences and the expertise of a wide range of majors.

Instructor: Gustavo Severo de Borba, Visiting Scholar, Honors College and Patti and Rusty Rueff School of Design, Art, and Performance

Credit Hours: 3


Course Description: 
This course introduces you to Strategic Design methodology as a tool for designing interdisciplinary solutions for local and global problems. Strategic Design is an interdisciplinary area of study that connects communication, architecture, engineering, art, business, and many other disciplines. We will apply this methodology to design solutions for achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Working in teams, you will prototype solutions for one of the 17 SDGs, based on team’s interest. Because of the interdisciplinarity of the strategic design process and our focus on sustainability, by the end of this course, you will have developed skills to solve complex problems in a range of areas, including your own discipline, whatever your field. You will also hone and demonstrate 21st century competencies of teamwork, collaboration, problem-solving, and design thinking. Let’s design a sustainable future!

Instructor: Muiris MacGiollabhui, Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, Honors College

Dr. Muiris MacGiollabhuí - Honors College - Purdue University

Credit Hours: 3


Course Description: 
This class introduces students to the role of banishment and exile in the making of the modern world. Seen as a less cruel form of punishment, and an alternative to public execution, governments around the world have used banishment and exile as a method to control their populations, creating diasporic communities as a result. Those forced into exile left embittered communities behind, scarred by the expulsion of their compatriots. In the communities that received them, they were met with skepticism, and at times, resistance. For the exiles themselves, the trauma of forced removal changed them in important ways. Some became radicalized as a result. Others yearned for home and put their hand to artistic pursuits to work through their grief. At other times, the bringing together of disaffected populations created networks of solidarity. Students will explore the psychological impacts of exile on those affected, how it has affected populations intergenerationally, the art that has blossomed in exiled communities, and the efforts to bring reconciliation and justice. Students will be exposed to exiled communities trans-historically, including the Indian Tamils of Sri Lanka, Irish exiles, the Jamaican Maroons, and the French Acadians. 

Instructor: Elizabeth Brite, Clinical Associate Professor, Honors College

Dr. Elizabeth Brite - Honors College - Purdue University

Credit Hours: 3


Course Description: 
At the turn of the new millennium, Nobel Prize Laureate Paul Crutzen and Eugene Stormer proposed that we had entered a new geologic epoch—the Anthropocene—a time when humans had become the dominant force on planet Earth. Anthropocene means “the human age,” and it is a concept that has become widely popular in scientific communities as a way to denote the extreme impacts humans are now having on the climate, the environment, and virtually all living things on Earth. Despite its popularity, however, the Anthropocene remains a hypothetical and hotly debated idea. The International Committee on Stratigraphy has yet to recognize it as a true geologic epoch (one that can be empirically observed in the layers of the Earth) and arguments persist over exactly when it may have begun, or the ways that the concept may mask the inequalities of environmental harm.  At its heart, the Anthropocene asks us to reconsider the role of humanity on planet Earth and drives us towards agendas focused on planetary change. In this course, we will explore the philosophical and scientific discourses of the Anthropocene and the concept’s implications for our present and future. Students will engage in developing their own positionality in relation to emerging knowledge on planetary change through a group project to bring prominent scholars of the Anthropocene to campus.

Instructor: Dwaine Jengelley, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

Dr. Dwaine Jengelley | Honors College


                     Anish Vanaik, Clinical Associate Professor, Honors College

Anish Vanaik | Honors College

Credit Hours: 3


Course Description: 
This is a course-based undergraduate research experience through which students can work towards completing the scholarly/creative project requirement of the Honors College. This semester, we’ll work with editorial cartoons created during and about the COVID-19 pandemic. Cartoons are a rich and hybrid medium of communication, and editorial cartoonists have generated a lively and unique record of the public arguments in this period.  

 

We will begin with an introduction to editorial cartoons as a communicative, artistic, and political form. Through a series of research development exercises, peers and faculty will then support your exploration of the archive of COVID-19 cartoons. By the end of the course, you will have produced a piece of original research ready for dissemination in the form of a journal special issue, online blog and/or panel presentations at undergraduate research conferences.

Instructor: Katie Jarriel, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

Dr. Katie Jarriel | Honors College

Credit Hours: 3


Course Description: 
What is our place in the world? We often mean this question metaphorically, but our literal place in the world—the spaces we inhabit, the built environment around us, and even the ways we think about space—influences us in profound ways. Insights from geospatial analysis are sometimes amazing: for example, the 1854 map of cholera outbreak made by Dr. John Snow in London led him to hypothesize that the disease spread through contaminated public water sources. However, spatial data can also be used to create inequalities within society, such as gerrymandering, redlining, and the colonial practice of partitioning cultural groups.

This course explores critical topics in geospatial analysis and the spatial turn, an intellectual movement that emphasizes space, place, and landscape as ways of understanding questions about our place in the world. We will learn how maps make arguments and how, sometimes, maps lie. We will discuss examples of different approaches to space, such as Foucault’s panopticon, Disney’s Magic Kingdom, Bourdieu’s Berber House, and Green’s Paper Towns. Students will try methods of geospatial analysis, from old-fashioned paper mapping to QGIS. For their final project, students will create and analyze a spatial dataset of their choosing.

Instructor: Jason Ware, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

Dr. Jason Ware | Honors College

Credit Hours: 3


Course Description: 
Tokyo, Berlin, Vienna, Copenhagen, and Munich are the five most livable cities in the world when using metrics to measure crime, emergency services’ response time, transportation networks, cycling culture, food, drink, retail, and the number of independent bookshops. Many surveys exist to rank the world’s best cities, but wealth is one theme that emerges from among the varying indices and their respective results. The metrics—indeed, the participants responding to the metrics—represent populations of people with high levels of discretionary income. How might the metrics reflect different values if these indices include a different kind of participant, such as the urban poor? Our goal in this course is to investigate indicators of community well-being related to quality of life within urban poor communities. The underlying premise is that urban poor communities across the globe have negligible influence in determining the criteria for measuring a city’s livability. We’ll imagine that material realities of poverty manifest in issues of failing infrastructure and poor living conditions that compromise healthy living, and that social realities manifest in decreased educational attainment and outcomes. All of which suggests that urban poor communities may produce collectively a set of indicators that create a different picture of what it looks like to live within urban environments. We’ll plan to work with urban poor communities within the Greater Lafayette area to create and capture these indicators, the result of which will be a set of inclusive indicators for influencing policy and producing enhanced local future outcomes and community wellbeing.

Instructor: Kristen Bellisario, Clinical Assistant Professor, Honors College

Kristen Bellisario | Honors College

Credit Hours: 3


Course Description:
With increased habitat fragmentation, air travel, and travel corridors, noise is ubiquitous and has an impact on both wildlife and people. In this course, students will design and conduct a research study about noise in the local community and discuss novel ideas to address these issues. The technical component of the course will cover properties of sound, techniques of qualitative and quantitative analyses, and basic R programming. No prior experience with R or computer programming required. Students will learn the fundamentals in this course. 


Students in this course are encouraged to conceive, propose, and complete a research project that will satisfy the “Scholarly Project” requirement of the Honors College curriculum.

Instructor: David Nelson, Associate Director, Center for Instructional Excellence

David Nelson | Center for Instructional Excellence

Molly Amstutz, Director, Institutional Data Analytics + Assessment

Molly Amstutz | Institutional Data Analytics + Assessment

Credit Hours: 1


Course Description: 
This course engages students directly in the research process through analysis of a wide variety institutional data that Purdue has collected. Working with faculty mentors, students use these data to answer research questions with practical implications for their peers and future students at Purdue. Drawing on Purdue’s Data Science Initiatives, students in this course will learn the basics of data research, how to create a research question, explore scholarly literature, test hypotheses and how data analysis can provide answers to questions about the student learning experience at a higher education institution like Purdue. This class provides an introduction to research with large data sets. However, this is not a class on statistical methods, and no previous knowledge of data analysis is required, though any background with research projects is helpful.