HONR Courses

Below is a listing of the Fall 2018 HONR course offerings. Click on the course name to view a description of the course. Please note the HONR 199 courses are for first and second-year students only; HONR 299 and 399 courses are open to all high ability students. A 3.0 GPA or higher is required to register for these courses.

Click here to download a print-friendly PDF of our Fall 2018's HONR course offerings.

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HONR 199

HONR 19903, CRN 68555, INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO WRITING

Instructor: Dr. Pete Moore
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and times: T/TH 3:00pm-4:15pm
Room: HCRS 1054

Brief Course Description:

There is a scene in the film True Romance in which a kind-hearted call girl steps into the light of an old movie marquee and says to her new fella, “when I see a good movie, I really like to go out and get some pie and talk about it. It’s like a tradition.” Gesturing to the social life of cinema, the line models a practice by which everyday people come together to talk about their world, as reflected in a single act of artistic expression. And what’s more, with the reference to pie, it makes the whole endeavor seem like a treat, a visceral pleasure to say what you think, to hear someone else, to relive an incredible image and interpret its meaning. These are the pleasures we will pursue in this interdisciplinary writing class. We will learn how to develop our loose and exciting ideas into carefully crafted, compelling essays. And we will practice the basic elements of academic writing, from conducting research to carrying out critical revisions, all by writing in response to the films of Quentin Tarantino.

Part of what’s oddly wonderful about the call girl’s line is that it was written by Tarantino, the controversial director who continues to spark countless pie-consuming conversations. He has been heralded as the Picasso of postmodern cinema and criticized as a morally corrupt merchant of schlock and awe. From his too-cool dialogue delivered over hemorrhaging wounds to his badly damaged characters who relish pop culture, Tarantino’s films have been debated and painstakingly analyzed in every medium from the scholarly essay to the spirited blogpost. In this course, we will use Tarantino’s films to write about issues that transcend disciplinary conventions, from race and violence to gender and postmodernity. As a group of nascent film buffs, we will learn how to look deeply, think differently and communicate effectively. And who knows, there may even be a slice of pie to enjoy along the way.

This course meets the core requirement for written communication and *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108. Consult with your primary advisor.

HONR 19903, CRN 23000, INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO WRITING

Instructor: Dr. Jason Parry
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and times: T/TH 1:30pm-2:45pm
Room: HCRS 1054

Brief Course Description:

From the oxygen-rich atmosphere produced in the earth’s early history by cyanobacteria to the carbon-rich atmosphere produced by industrial civilization, our planet has been thoroughly designed by bio-technical processes. But much of this design has taken place haphazardly, thoughtlessly. In this course, we will learn to look at reality in what the architect Alejandro Aravena calls “a proposal key” and mobilize the written word as a tool for formulating, critiquing, and revising design ideas at varying levels of scale. Given the thorough entanglement of technological, economic, and political structures in our contemporary world system, this course will use the lens of design to think constructively about global problems encompassing diverse realms of knowledge. We will strive to develop both the humility to seek out design solutions in the vast archive of human and natural history and the boldness to propose something radically new.

This course meets the core requirement for written communication and *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108. Consult with your primary advisor.

HONR 299

HONR 29900, CRN 14733, WELL-BEING

Instructor: Dr. Jason Ware
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 9:00am - 10:15am

Room: HCRS 1066

Brief Course Description:

Tokyo, Berlin, Vienna, Copenhagen, and Munich are the five most liveable cities in the world according to Monocle’s 2016 Quality of Life index. They are the highest ranking cities when using metrics to measure crime, emergency services’ response time, transportation networks, cycling culture, food, drink, retail, and the number of independent bookshops. Monocle’s Quality of Life survey is merely one among the many that exist to rank the world’s best cities, but wealth is one theme that emerges from among the varying indecies and their respective results. The metrics, indeed the participants responding to the metrics, represent populations of people with high levels of discretionary income. How might the metrics reflect different values if these indices include a different kind of participant, such as the urban poor?

Our goal in this course is to investigate indicators of community well-being related to quality of life with urban poor communities. The underlying premise is that urban poor communities across the globe – living even in Tokyo, Berlin, Vienna, Copenhagen, and Munich – have negligible influence in determining the criteria for measuring a city’s livability. We’ll imagine that material realities of poverty manifest in issues of failing infrastructure and poor living conditions that compromise healthy living, and that social realities manifest in decreased educational attainment and outcomes. All of which suggests that urban poor communities may produce collectively a set of metrics, of indicators, that create a different picture of what it looks like to live within urban environments. We’ll plan to work with urban poor communities within the Greater Lafayette area to create and capture these indicators, the result of which will be a set of inclusive indicators for influencing policy and producing enhanced local future outcomes and community well-being.

HONR 29900, CRN 19008, THE ANIMAL

Instructor: Dr. Megha Anwer
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 10:30am – 1145am
Room: HCRS 1054

Brief Course Description:

This is an interdisciplinary course that approaches animals through the intersections between philosophy, veterinarian science, bioethics, literature, cinema and art. Here we will examine the ways in which human beings have constructed and deployed the idea of "the animal" and defined themselves in opposition to non-human creatures. At the same time, the course will investigate the inseparability of the human-animal worlds. Some of the themes that we will explore in class are: the institutionalization of animals -- in zoos and circuses, as pets; animal labor and animal industries (eg. meat industry); animals as entertainment -- in films (the most recent being Fantastical Beasts and Where to Find Them), and in "funny animal videos" on social media; animals in folklore and children's literature; the history of animal vivisection. In trying to grapple with animal psychology and animal language, we will, hopefully learn much more about our own ways of inhabiting an inter-species world. The course will also include exciting field trips to the Lafayette Zoo and the Wolf Park.

HONR 29900, Section 010, CRN 19102, STEM CELLS

Instructor: Dr. Zahra Tehrani
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 10:30am – 11:45am

Room: HCRS 1066


Stem cells have the potential to revolutionize the way medicine is practiced today. Some stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective and are already being used successfully to treat thousands of people worldwide. Other stem cell therapies are considered experimental, therefore treatments must be monitored by the Food and Drug Administration to ensure safety and efficacy. Finally, some stem cell therapies are offered with minimal scientific justification relying on the false hope of desperate patients and hype in the media rather than sound scientific evidence. The goal of this course is to explore the use of stem cells in modern medicine and to take a close look at the science as well as the hype behind some of today’s most famous and infamous stem cell medical applications. How can we tell science from hype, and where do science, policy and ethics intersect?

HONR 29900, CRN 19105, SPORTS & Politics

Instructor: Dr. Dwaine Jengelley
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 9:00am - 10:15am
Room: HCRS 1054

Brief Course Description:

Sport is much more than a pastime. It is also a force and a forum, which governments, interest groups, and individuals use to advance political causes or make statements for change. Take, for example, the 1994 Rugby World Cup in South Africa, when Nelson Mandela, the recently elected president of South Africa, used this sporting event as an opportunity for nation building. The raised fists of John Carlos and Tommie Smith at the 1968 summer Olympics were a statement against racist policies in the United States, and the international stage gave these athletes a global audience to see/hear their message. Many scholars describe China's hosting of the 2008 Olympics and Brazil's hosting of the World Cup in 2014 as debutant balls for these rising global powers. In this course, we will examine the relationship of politics and sports. Through a case study approach, students will analyze how sporting events and sports overall serve various actors' political agendas.

HONR 29900, CRN 19112, HUMAN REDESIGN

Instructor: Dr. Adam Watkins
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 3:00pm-4:15pm

Room: HCRN 1143


Brief Course Description:

What does it mean to be human? What place do humans occupy in the grand scheme of things? Are all humans equal? Consider for a moment that in 1800, the answers to these question differed greatly from what people generally believe today. This was a time before psychology, neurology, and sociology were established disciplines; it was a time of quack theories, mad science, and the birth of science fiction.

By exploring key discoveries and great literary works, students will discover how science and the arts collaborated in a radical redesign of the human subject across the nineteenth century. For instance, students will explore how R.L Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde drew from cutting edge psychological research, and how Charles Darwin incorporated nineteenth-century narrative tricks into On the Origin of Species to make his theory more palatable. The class is strongly discussion based, and students will participate in exciting projects geared around their individual interests, including the invention of their own quack theory and the creation of a short horror story based on cutting edge scientific research, after the model of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

HONR 29900, CRNs 19213/19214, MUSIC AS A CHARIOT

Instructor: Dr. Richard Thomas
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 1:30pm-3:20pm

Room: PAO B185


Brief Course Description:

This project-based course will introduce students to an aesthetic vocabulary of design elements that is useful in both visual and auditory design and music composition. By the end of the semester students should be able to articulate an individual aesthetic regarding the art of sound, identify elements of color, mass, time, space and line in sound scores, and more effectively use these same elements in their own design compositions.

Almost 14 billion years ago, the Big Bang set into motion fundamental laws that govern the behavior of energy in time and space. These laws made music not only possible, but eventually caused music to evolve into a fundamental communicator of the human experience. “Music as a Chariot” combines scientific, biological, anthropological, neurological, philosophical, psychological and historical evidence into a fascinating story that explains and explores the dominance of music in popular culture, and the fundamental role it plays in empowering ideas in song and dramatic action.

This course is intended for students who are keenly interested in exploring the relationship between the music/sound they create, the audience who experiences that sound or music, and the human condition. As such, students will need to have a portable device that records audio. Students must also have some ability to create and record their own compositions. It is important to note that grades are not assigned based on the quality of the compositions, but strictly on timely submissions and following submission guidelines.

HONR 29900, CRN 21448, FOOD SECURITY

Instructors:
Dr. Gebisa Ejeta
Dr. Liz Brite

# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: M/F 11:30am-12:25pm

Room: MGRM 129


Brief Course Description:

This course examines the complex issue of human food security in different global and local contexts. The course will consist of two main components: (1) Global Food Security—students will engage in weekly, 1-hour lectures delivered by Dr. Gebisa Ejeta, Distinguished Professor of Plant Breeding and Genetics and Director of the Center for Global Food Security, on global food security issues; (2) Local Food Security—students will participate in weekly, 1-hour discussions and project work that center on issues of local food security, with a specific focus on campus food security. Students will design and implement a research study to assess food security at Purdue, supplemented by site visits, reading discussions, and reflection activities that will help to construct and make meaning from the research endeavor. Site visits may include: Purdue Student Farm, Purdue Community Gardens, Food Finders, Inc., Purdue Dining.

HONR 29900, CRNs 20440/20443, REFUGEE CRISIS

Instructor: Dr. Natasha Duncan
# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: T/TH 12:00pm-1:15pm

Room: HCRN 1143


Brief Course Description:

What makes persons refugees? What are the obligations of the international community toward non-nationals seeking asylum? Is there a solution to the Refugee Crisis? This 8-week course explores these questions and more using texts, videos, and discussions to examine the root causes of displacement, journeys to safety, reception by destination countries, and issues of social justice and human security. The course emphasizes the agency of refugees and asylum seekers, the gendered processes affecting mobility, and the role of sending and receiving countries, particularly in the context of 20th and 21st century refugee crises. Students have an opportunity to work first-hand with newly arrived members of the refugee community in the United States by signing up for the 1 credit service-learning course (page 10 in packet) over October Break, also taught by Professor Duncan ("Welcome to America!" 1-Credit Weekend).

This course meets the first 8 weeks of the semester (August 20 - October 16, 2018). In addition to the lecture, there is an online component for this course.

HONR 29900, CRNs 19768/19769, LETTERPRESS WORKSHOP

Instructor: Dr. Pete Moore
# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: T/TH 1:30pm-2:45pm

Room: HCRS 1076 [STEAM Lab]


Brief Course Description:

This 8-week workshop introduces students to the art of letterpress printing. We will divide our time into four, two-week long units, the first of which will provide students with an overview of the equipment and processes entailed in letterpress printing. The following three units will be dedicated to the production of three different projects. The first will be a specimen page of a specific typographical font, laying out the different characters of a given font in an aesthetically pleasing formation. The second will be a poster for an event in the Honors College, providing students with the opportunity to consult with a client and develop an advertisement that builds upon the stated goals. The final unit will invite students to create a fine-art print, allowing them to experiment with abstraction. By the end of the course, students will receive instruction in the following skills: Make-ready and Press Prep, Composition, Locking-Up a Form, Running the Press, Editioning a Print, and Maintaining the Press. While no previous experience is necessary, students with an interest in visual composition, text-based art and creative expression are encouraged to enroll.

This course meets the first 8 weeks of the semester (August 20 - October 16, 2018). In addition to the lecture, there is an online component for this course.

HONR 399

HONR 39900, CRN 15189, DESIGNING THE FUTURE

Instructors:
Dr. Robin Adams
Dr. Rayvon Fouche
Dr. Shannon McMullen

# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 3:00pm – 4:15pm

Room: HCRS 1076 [STEAM Lab]


Brief Course Description:

Technology is an intriguing object of social and cultural inquiry. Creative producers of technology like engineers and industrial designers are defined by their material production rather than their written output. Therefore, technology’s history is signified more by the reading of artifacts than through the analyses of written documents. This course will focus on the various ways technology has shaped the modern world and the processes by which we can critically examine forms, uses, and meanings of objects, images, and environments in everyday life. By questioning familiar boundaries between traditional definitions of craft, design, art, and skill in technological contexts, we will explore the ways technology drives history and history shapes technology. By studying the ways that society, culture, and identity inform technology’s complex history, we can gain deeper understandings of how material objects influence human existence.

HONR 39900, CRN 19177, SHAPING PUBLIC OPINION

Instructors:
Dr. Rosanne Altstatt
Dr. Harry Denny
Dr. Evan Perrault

# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: W 8:30am – 9:20am

Room: HCRN 1145


Brief Course Description:

The world would like to hear from you. Each time we browse a newsfeed, we discover current events affecting college students like you right now. Whether climate change, digital privacy, student loans, immigration, food security, public health or civil discourse: Such topics aren’t just buzzworthy today; they contain issues which will frame your everyday life and how you will live and work tomorrow. You are the climatologists and agriculturalists of the near future, the engineers and the economists, the lawyers and the medical researchers. Your backgrounds and your thoughts should be heard. You may not know where exactly you will land, but you can look at where you have been so far and which direction you – and the world – are going. Your opinion matters and can become a vehicle of change when it is informed and well expressed to a variety of audiences. Don’t limit your ability to communicate to those only within your personal and professional bubbles. Your voice should be part of shaping public opinion and your future.

This class will help you identify your narrative by linking your personal stories and your major disciplines with your future and the current public discourse. We will work on the nuts and bolts of writing opinion pieces for broad audiences, identifying those outlets, and teaching you how to translate and pitch your ideas. Students of any discipline are welcome. Second- and third-year students are particularly encouraged to participate.

HONR 39900, CRN 19216, DISASTER RESILIENCE

Instructors:
Dr. Seungyoon Lee
Dr. Satish Ukkusuri

# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 12:00pm – 1:15pm
Room: HCRS 1066

Brief Course Description:

Recent disasters such as Hurricanes Sandy and Harvey provide important lessons about the vulnerabilities that cities face and the impacts they have on society. Disaster management requires an understanding of the complexity of the issues surrounding disasters including how infrastructure such as power, water and transportation goes through failures and recovery, how communities cope with the impacts, what role technologies play in the recovery of these communities, and how data can be gathered to assess and assist with recovery. This course will provide an introduction to the various phases of disaster management including planning, response, recovery and resilience of communities. In addition, the course will provide an introduction to the role of new technologies such as social media tools and sensor technology that enable the real time understanding of needs and citizen concerns in disasters. The course will integrate social scientific and engineering perspectives as well as maintain a balance of qualitative and quantitative methods to understand disaster management issues. The course will be driven by real world example of natural disasters based on the instructors’ research experience in the field with data about people, infrastructure and institutions in earthquakes, hurricanes and tornadoes. Experts on this topic will be invited to give presentations in the class.

HONR 39900, CRN 19215, RISE & FALL OF AN AMERICAN EMPIRE

Dr. Steve Hallett

# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: MWF 8:30am – 9:20am
Room: HCRN 1143

Brief Course Description:

The major hot-button topics related to this course are taught in various departments and colleges throughout the university. Rarely, however, do we consider them together. As a result, engineers may develop a deep understanding of the oil industry without grasping the importance of global warming, and environmental scientists might study global warming without understanding the oil or coal industries. Likewise, agriculture students might discuss bio-fuels without understanding the economics of their implementation. Economists might recognize the impact of Chinese manufacturing on the global economy without recognizing its impact on the environment. This course, rather ambitiously, attempts to join the dots.

Another important goal of the course is to look at how the various global challenges will play out in different parts of the world. Overpopulation, for example, is a global problem, and yet the populations of most of the developed world are rather stable; the populations of Japan and Germany are shrinking. The political will to implement fuel efficiency standards and sources of renewable energy is strong in Europe, growing in the USA, and yet virtually non-existent in China and India. Global warming is likely to be disastrous in flood-prone Bangladesh, but may improve farming conditions in Canada.

We will take a trip through history, analyzing the relationships between human societies and their environment. We will discuss the emergence of farming and the early evolution of societies, and study the role of environmental exploitation in the demise of various civilizations. We will discuss the history of fossil fuels, the ways in which they have transformed the world, and the geopolitics of fossil fuel acquisition. Looking at the modern world, we will investigate the full range of growing global problems related to population, fossil fuel depletion, global warming, and food production. We will also analyze potential remedies, such as renewable energy (and nuclear energy). Importantly, we will discuss all these topics in the context of political and economic constraints. Perhaps the really important questions are not whether we can “save the world”, but rather whether we will…

HONR 499

HONR 49900, CRN 20543, INSTITUTIONAL DATA RESEARCH

Instructor: Dr. David Nelson

# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: W 3:30pm – 4:20pm

Room: HCRN 1145


Brief Course Description:

HONR 499 is a two-part course available for Honors College students. There are no pre-requisites and the course is open to students at all classification levels. The course engages students directly in the research process through analysis of a wide variety institutional data that Purdue has collected. Working with faculty mentors, students use these data to answer research questions with practical implications for their peers and future students at Purdue.

Drawing on Purdue’s Data Science Initiatives, students in this course will learn the basics of data research, how to create a research question, explore scholarly literature, test hypotheses and how data analysis can provide answers to questions about the student learning experience at a higher education institution like Purdue. This class provides an introduction to research with large data sets. However, this is not a class on statistical methods, and no previous knowledge of data analysis is required, though any background with research projects is helpful. If you are the type of person who is interested in data science and likes to propose questions and explore them with guidance from research faculty, this might be the course for you.

The class meets once weekly, for 50 minutes in the fall semester, and monthly during the spring semester. In the spring semester, students spend additional arranged time completing their projects with a faculty mentor, the HONR 499 instructor, and members of Purdue’s Office of Institutional Research, Assessment and Evaluation.

Enrollment in this class is by invitation, in order to create the right mix of disciplines and skills. Students from every major are invited to apply.
Please click here to apply: https://sp2013.itap.purdue.edu/honors/InstitutionalDataApp/SitePages/Home.aspx
Deadline: Wednesday, March 7, 2018

HONR 49900, CRN 19766, SCIENCE & STORIES RESEARCH

Instructor: Dr. David Purpura

# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 10:30am – 11:45am

Room: HCRN 1143


Brief Course Description:

This course is designed to bring together students from across multiple disciplines to develop an educational children’s book that can be used to enhance preschool children’s knowledge of early mathematics concepts. Students will develop an in depth knowledge of the scientific literature surrounding children’s book development, an aspect of early mathematics skills, and empirically supported best practices in reading with young children. As a team, the students, under supervision of Dr. Purpura, will work to develop (1) an engaging story that effectively incorporates early mathematics content, (2) rich and engaging prompts for teachers and parents to use while reading the story, and (3) illustrations that highlight the storyline and can be used to bring out the rich mathematical content. In addition, students will work through an iterative design process where they receive and incorporate feedback on the design and development from both parents and teachers. The final product from the course will be both a paper and e-book that can be used by parents or teachers of preschool children.

Enrollment in this class is by invitation, in order to create the right mix of disciplines and skills. Students from every major are invited to apply.
Please click here to apply: https://sp2013.itap.purdue.edu/honors/ScienceStoriesApp/SitePages/Home.aspx
Deadline: Wednesday, March 7, 2018

*NEW!* 1-CREDIT WEEKEND

HONR 29900, CRN 19778, ARCHITECTURE OF CHICAGO

Instructor: Dr. Pete Moore

# of Credit Hours: 1
FALL BREAK Trip to Chicago, IL
Dates: October 6-9, 2018

Brief Course Description:

The city of Chicago is synonymous with architectural feats of wonder. But as much as it is the setting for innovative design and poetic dwelling, it is also the scene of built problems, a city commonly criticized for its neglect of public housing as well as its segregative plans for urban renewal. This three-day course will engage with these issues through an immersive tour of architectural sites in Chicago. Day one will feature a general exploration of the city’s landmarks, including a boat tour of iconic lakeshore landmarks. Day two will focus on the work of famed architect Mies van der Rohe, examining his contributions to the Illinois Institute of Technology campus. Day three will move into the contemporary moment, with a guided survey of the work of Theaster Gates, an artist committed to rescuing buildings in the predominantly black Southside neighborhoods, turning them into communal spaces for creative endeavor.

The approximate cost for this study tour is $500.00 which includes transportation, lodging and some meals

HONR 29900, CRN 20446, WELCOME TO AMERICA

Instructor: Dr. Natasha Duncan

# of Credit Hours: 1
FALL BREAK Trip to Columbus, OH
Dates: October 6-9, 2018

Brief Course Description:

Become ambassadors for the United States by working in the communities that resettle newly arriving refugees while earning credit. This course provides students with the pportunity to work with and learn from persons who fled their home countries in an effort to find safe haven and start a new life in the United States. Over the October Break weekend, students will volunteer with various refugee resettlement agencies in Columbus, OH, engaging in service in areas such as reception, language instruction, employment readiness instruction, and donation support. By the end the course, in addition to serving new Americans, students will learn first-hand about the process for seeking asylum and reflect on the public debates surrounding the Refugee Crisis and human security.

The approximate cost for this study tour is $500.00 which includes transportation, lodging and some meals.