HONR Courses

Below is a listing of the Spring 2019 HONR course offerings. Click on the course name to view a description of the course. Please note the HONR 199 courses are for first and second-year students only; HONR 299 and 399 courses are open to all high ability students. A 3.0 GPA or higher is required to register for these courses.

Click here to download a print-friendly PDF of our Spring 2019's HONR course offerings.

Click here to see all of the Study Away programs.


HONR 199

HONR 19903, SECTION 001, CRN 69810, INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO WRITING

Instructor: Dr. Megha Anwer
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and times: T/TH 10:30-11:45am
Room: HCRS 1054

Brief Course Description:

This course will initiate students into a culture of writing and critical thinking through a study of James Bond and his world of international espionage. The primary goals in the classroom will be twofold: first, to equip students with productive and empowering strategies that break down the writing process into a series of doable steps. The repeated practice of these strategies will facilitate students to employ words effectively, with confidence. By the end of the course students will have crafted and developed their own voice, their unique way of thinking and expressing ideas. It is impossible, however, to write effectively without reading and thinking critically. This is why our writing exercises will focus on “sexy spies.” Using James Bond as the central figure we will investigate the “007” franchise – Ian Fleming’s Bond novels and cinematic the renditions of Bond – from Sean Connery to Daniel Craig. In analyzing the rhetoric and thematic underpinnings of the Bond universe – its women, villains, bosses and secretaries, the sleuth’s prized gadgets and cars – we will explore the relationship between the words we produce and the worlds we inhabit.

This course meets the core requirement for written communication and *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108. Consult with your primary advisor.

HONR 19903, SECTION 002, CRN 17258, INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO WRITING

Instructor: Dr. Jason Parry
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and times: T/TH 1:30pm-2:45pm
Room: HCRS 1054

Brief Course Description:

“The people should fight on behalf of their laws,” wrote the Greek philosopher Heraclitus, “as they would for their city wall.” But what to make of this ancient association between walls and laws? While the former delimits space, the latter delimits human conduct. In this course, we will study how laws harden into space, producing borders, checkpoints and territories. Conversely, we will also see how events in space can sunder the laws that govern it, producing revolutionary upheaval and new forms of occupation. We will trace the history of political space, from the fall and rise of the citystate to the rise and fall of empires, and consider some overlooked episodes (and possible futures) in the history of political organization: from libertarian seasteading projects and pirate utopias to autonomous peasant societies and global governing bodies.

This course meets the core requirement for written communication and *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108. Consult with your primary advisor.

HONR 299

HONR 29900, SECTION 010, CRN 17259, RESEARCH NETWORKS

Instructor: Dr. Katie Jarriel
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: M/W 11:30am-12:20pm (Jan. 7 - Mar. 1, 2019)
Room: HCRN 1143

Room: HCRN 1143

Brief Course Description:

This course provides an introduction to interdisciplinary research so that Honors College students will be prepared to undertake the Scholarly Project. This course also provides hands-on opportunities to build your Honors cohort and to forge connections with other Honors College students and faculty, as well as with the students, faculty, and resources of Purdue as a whole. You will learn how to conduct interdisciplinary research by listening to guest faculty and student speakers; visiting labs, libraries, and workshops on campus; and attending departmental events. At the end of this course, you will have established your own research network at Purdue. Your final project will be to illustrate your individual research network, detailing the people and resources that will help you succeed in your undergraduate research endeavors.

HONR 29900, SECTION 011, CRN 17339, MAKING GREATER LAFAYETTE GREATER

Dr. Ilana Stonebraker
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 3:00-4:15pm
Room: HCRN 1145

Brief Course Description:

Good things happen when we work together. Be a part of the change — explore Greater Lafayette area through field trips, design sessions and guest speakers. Investigate a key issue for the Greater Lafayette area important to you. Present a plan to the community. Make a difference now.

This course blends service learning and design-based thinking to allow students to think critically about their Greater Lafayette community and how to better serve it. The overall learning goals are: 1) Students will articulate the struggles the Greater Lafayette area faces at a local and global level across cultural, economic and administrative dimensions; 2) Students will find, organize and evaluate information about the Greater Lafayette area; 3) Students will identify sources to learn more about problems important to them; 4) Students will develop an actionable plan for either the Lafayette or West Lafayette city governments to implement change in the community. As part of the course, students will explore various different “problems” and “solutions” in the community through a wide variety of field trips. They will also gain skills in collaboration, information finding, communication, and community building that will serve them in their scholarly fields and future life.

HONR 29900, SECTION 009, CRN 17709, JAZZ IN NOLA

Instructor: Dr. Jason Ware
# of Credit Hours: 2
SPRING BREAK Study Away Trip to New Orleans, LA
Dates: March 9-17, 2019

Brief Course Description:

To study jazz is to study away, to take one’s place in a boogaloo procession breaking out of the classroom and into the streets, the kitchens, the club, the porch, the hall. To study jazz is to trace a tradition that has itself traveled from Africa to the American South, from the South to the industrial North, and from there to corners of the world. More than just a musical genre, jazz names a way of life, a means of recording history, a stump from which to express one’s personal needs and desires, a lab for the social production of culture. Along these lines, we will use the city of New Orleans and the style of New Orleans Jazz as a case point for understanding the music and culture of improvisation. We will explore the emergence of jazz music against the historical backdrop of the transatlantic slave trade and research the process by which a certain style of American music was solidified into a specific genre, known as jazz.

HONR 29900, SECTION 012, CRN 17344, PURDUE AT 150

Instructor: Dr. Kris Bross
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: T 4:30-5:20pm
Room: HCRN 1145

Brief Course Description:

It’s Purdue’s 150th birthday! This class will be hosting and holding conversations about great teaching, Purdue’s history, and the future of higher education. At the heart of our course will be a series of public forums (that we’ll be hosting) in the Honors College, featuring faculty chosen as “150th Anniversary Professors,” teachers from across the university who are among our most distinguished and inspiring instructors. The major project for the semester will be an original research project analyzing the best instructional practices on campus, a project we’ll be performing in collaboration with the Center for Instructional Excellence.

HONR 399

HONR 39900, SECTION 011, CRN 17338, THE HOLOCENE

Instructor: Dr. Liz Brite
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 12:00-1:15pm
Room: HCRS 1054

Brief Course Description:

The Holocene is the geologic epoch of the last 11,700 years. It is a period of stable and warm climate that has witnessed the growth of human civilizations worldwide – all written history, cities and urban life, complex technologies, and states and empires have arisen exclusively during this period. Why? The favorable environmental conditions of the Holocene have allowed us to transform the environment and exploit its resources to an extreme degree, principally through production practices based in agriculture. In this course, we will explore this relationship between climate, environment, and the development of human societies throughout the geologic epoch of the Holocene. A principle focus will be the critical role that agriculture has played in the development of our species and in accelerating our impacts on Earth’s ecosystems. In addition to surveying this deep history, students will engage in new knowledge creation about the Holocene through ethnographic research and writing. Together as a class, we will address the current debate about the Holocene’s end – the idea that humanity’s abilities to transform the environment have become so significant and so extreme that they are driving the Earth system into a new epoch. In particular, students will observe and consider agriculture’s ongoing evolution and impacts on the environment and its role in broader systems of anthropogenic change.

HONR 39900, SECTION 103, CRN 17341, CRIME SLEUTHING

Instructor: Dr. Trevor Stamper
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 12:00-1:15pm
Room: HCRN 1145

Brief Course Description:

History is replete with cases that have challenged the forensic scientists and investigators. Often, this is due to the limits of the available technology. In this course, students will examine the role technological advancements have played in facilitating (more robust) answers to baffling, complex crime scene questions. Specifically, you will investigate old cases that challenged scientists at the time and evaluate how these cases might be solved using contemporary technology and discipline frameworks (e.g.—standard operating procedures). You will gather data on cases using original case files, newspaper accounts, documentaries, etc. The overarching goal of the course is for you to evaluate how forensic techniques have grown over time, with an eye toward an understanding of evidence collection, analysis, and testimony used by disciplines within forensic science. Emphasis will be placed on a broad range of research strategies to recover primary and secondary literature supporting the cases chosen.

HONR 39900, SECTION 008, CRN 17316, FUGITIVITY

Instructor: Dr. Peter Moore
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 12:00–1:15pm
Room: HCRS 1066

Brief Course Description:

Some people want to run things, and some things just want to run. This is a class about the latter, or better yet, it is a class about the way in which these two imperatives—to exact control and to imagine flight—are inextricably bound up with one another. In pursuing this topic, we will attend to a specific historical circumstance and its many afterlives. In the thirty or more years preceding the American Civil War, enslaved men and women of African descent made use of an elaborate network of transit and shelter to escape from the slave economy of the southern states. Referred to as the Underground Railroad, the passage has remained a persistent concern of black cultural expression. We will study its movement across time and media, from the slave narrative to the serial poem, from the folk ballad to the chopped sample, and from scissored silhouette to spliced footage. We will consider the invisible road to freedom in its historical context and as a conceit for liberatory theories of social life. Joining us along the way for an in-class visit will be Colson Whitehead, author of the National Book Award Winning novel The Underground Railroad (2016). All aspects of the course are designed to feed into the final assignment. Students will have an opportunity to make a significant contribution to the study of the Underground Railroad through working collaboratively on a plan for a digital humanities project that maps the emancipatory routes that ran through Indiana.

HONR 39900, SECTION 010, CRN 17329, IM/MORTALITY

Instructor: Dr. Zahra Tehrani
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 10:30-11:45am
Room: HCRS 1066

Brief Course Description:

This interdisciplinary course introduces you biological, psychological and social theories of aging to provide foundational knowledge regarding how and why we age. Given new medical technologies, is it possible that humans will stop aging together? Would that be desirable? What would it mean to be “immortal,” and why do are we drawn to the idea? The biological question of lifespan opens up to (and is informed by) issues of population, resources, policy, family dynamics, and personal well-being. Do you want to live forever? What would the world be like if we did?

HONR 39900, SECTION 004, CRN 17265, JAZZ

Instructor: Dr. Jason Ware
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 9:00-10:15am
Room: HCRS 1054

Brief Course Description:

Jazz artists “speak to each other in the language of music.” in Jazz we will explore the nature of this artistic conversation with many of its cultural influences, geographical variations, and temporal iterations. Throughout our time together we will interrogate varying facets of the social impact such a conversation facilitates. Furthermore, we will explore the musical language of jazz with its power to make collective performance stronger both within and beyond music. And we will investigate the ways in which this artists' talk became the "talk of the town" and country as a medium through which people could break from dominant cultures. We will make sense of and process our journey by creating our own metaphorical jazz ensemble, featuring the complex and layered textures of our lives as inspiration for the note and lyric.

**You do not need to be a musician to take this course**

HONR 39900, SECTION 015, CRN 17388, FOR THE LOVE OF ANIMALS

Instructor: Dr. David Williams
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: W 10:30-11:20am
Room: HCRN 1143

Brief Course Description:

What can be said of the remarkable artworks of buffalo, rhinoceroses, lions, and dark-maned horses found in the caves of early man? What was their purpose? Who created them, and how? Cats were sacred in Ancient Egypt, and some were mummified. Harming a cat could result in a harsh punishment. In this course students with an interest in these, and many other questions, will study the early origin of man’s fascination with animals from the Paleolithic era, Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, and East and South Asia. Particular attention will be paid to works of art that help demonstrate man’s fascination with animals, and the course of hunting, herding, and domestication. What is domestication, and how did it occur? This course is appropriate for students with no previous study of history or art history. What is required is an interest and curiosity in the subject.

HONR 39900, SECTION 14, CRN 17358, LIFE ON MARS

Instructors:
Dr. Antonio Bobet
Dr. Shirley Dyke

# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: M 3:30-6:20pm
Room: HCRS 1054

Brief Course Description:

The course focuses on the technical and societal needs for human habitats beyond the Earth. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams, at the interface of humanities and science and engineering, to develop detailed plans for a sustainable Mars habitat. Topics to be investigated include risk, governance, human and economic factors, living conditions, and technologies that will influence everyday life in a permanent extraterrestrial habitat. The course includes learning modules, lectures and team activities designed to encourage thorough consideration of the needs, the risks, and the solutions that will lead to the establishment of such habitats on Mars. Speakers will be invited to present topics relevant to the course objectives. The course also includes guided class discussions and presentations.

This course is open to Science & Society Learning Community students only.

HONR 39900, SECTION 012, CRN 17340, THOUGHT AND CULTURE OF MODERNITY

Instructor: Dr. Arkady Plotnitsky
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 1:30-2:45pm
Room: HCRN 1145

Brief Course Description:

The aim of course is to explore as much the contribution of the humanities, in particular, literature to mathematics and science as that of mathematics and science to the humanities, in particular, literature. The course will begin with the Copernican revolution, which literally removed us, along with our planet from the center of the world, and a joint reading of selections from Galileo’s Dialogues Concerning Two New Systems of the World and John Milton’s Paradise Lost, as two examples of, respectively, scientific and literary visions of the post-Copernican world of nature and humanity. We will then consider some of the key developments in science and literature in the 18th and 19th centuries, which shaped the 20th-century understanding of the world, in particular thermodynamics and modern biology in science, and the idea of the novel in literature. Among the literary works to be discussed are Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Abbott’s Flatland. Finally, we will discuss such 20th-century developments as Einstein’s relativity and modern cosmology, quantum theory, and neuroscience, on the scientific side, and the works of such authors as Bertold Brecht, Tom Stoppard and Thomas Pynchon, on the literary side. We will also discuss some popular writings by leading contemporary scientists, such as Richard Feynman, Stephen Hawking, Eric Kandel.

HONR 39900, SECTION 002/003, CRN 17261/17262, POP CULTURE CLASSICS

Instructor: Dr. Katie Jarriel
# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: T/TH 1:30-2:45pm
Room: HCRN 1143
This course meets March 4 - April 26, 2019
This course also has a distance learning component

Brief Course Description:

The mythological traditions of ancient Greece and Rome have had a lasting effect on western civilization, to the extent that modern popular culture is suffused with references to classical themes. In "Pop Culture Classics," we will examine how pop culture—including movies, literature, music, art, and digital media—has interpreted, re-imagined, and recontextualized the literary and material record of classical Greece and Rome. We will explore themes in the contemporary reception of classical works such as Herodotus' Histories and Orientalism in Frank Miller's 300; the Pygmalion myth and sci-fi horror; and epic journeys from Homer's Odyssey to Mad Max: Fury Road. For the final project, the class will collectively produce a blog juxtaposing classical and pop culture media.

HONR 39900, SECTION 007/006, CRN 17271/17269, SUPERHEROES

Instructor: Dr. Diane Facinelli
# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: M/W 1:30-2:20pm
Room: HCRN 1143
This course meets March 4 - April 26, 2019
This course also has a distance learning component

Brief Course Description:

Superheroes and American Culture examines the historical and social influences on and effects of superheroes as a part of American culture. Materials examined mainly will consist of superhero comic and graphic novels with references to other media along with critical texts. Students will analyze and discuss works, looking at such things as visual rhetoric, history, philosophy, religion and science.

HONR 39900, SECTION 0016, CRN 17395, SPORTS MATERIALS & TECHNOLOGY

Instructors:
Dr. Jan-Anders Mansson
Dr. Joshua Martin

# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: W 9:30-10:20am
Room: HCRN 1143

Brief Course Description:

This course introduces students to the fundamental mechanics, materials, and technology of popular sports and pushes the students to critically evaluate the future direction of sport technology development. This lecture-based course is organized into three primary sections; an introduction to mechanics and materials fundamentals, an assessment of the science and technology of a variety of popular sports, and discussions on the sustainability and the future of sport technology. The course also introduces the typical interdisciplinary nature of technology development in the sporting equipment industry through integration of material properties with design parameters to achieve specific performance requirements.

HONR 39900, SECTION 009, CRN 17328, SPACETIME!

Instructor: Dr. Adam Watkins
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 3:00-4:15pm
Room: HCRN 1143

Brief Course Description:

This course will boldly go where no course has gone before, providing students the chance to explore strange new ideas about space and time. Want to write a sequel to Interstellar or your own episode of Star Trek? Want to see how our idea of spacetime has evolved in response to religion, philosophy, and physics? Want to hear Purdue scientists talk about science fiction that matters to them?

To study spacetime requires that we engage a variety of perspectives from the past and present. In that sense, HONR 399: Spacetime! is deeply historical and philosophical in its approach. The course also takes an active interest in creative processes behind scientific thought. To that end, students will explore how arts and symbolic thought have played significant roles in scientific discoveries, including Einstein’s. Students will also practice creative modes of inquiry firsthand, as course projects will be based in creative writing practices.

[Note: projects will be assessed on critical and creative thinking, not artistic quality.]